This collection consists of articles, papers, keynote and other major speeches, reviews, and responses, mostly related to music education, but some to arts education and arts business, in some cases with reference to emerging countries. A number of these items appeared in difficult-to-access publications such as foreign journals and foreign and domestic proceedings. A few are translations of English-language articles that appeared in foreign language journals, and a few others are in English with accompanying foreign language abstracts.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 87

United States of America: Reflections on the Development and Effectiveness of Compulsory Music Education

Description

Compulsory education and school laws were enacted in the British colonies of North America beginning from the 1640s. Compulsory school laws were gradually enacted in all states of the United

Compulsory education and school laws were enacted in the British colonies of North America beginning from the 1640s. Compulsory school laws were gradually enacted in all states of the United States of America between 1852 and 1918, with enforcement of the laws following gradually and but unevenly in the various states. Today, most states require attendance up to age 16. Music was gradually introduced to the elementary school curriculum from the 1830s. Today, music is mandatory for all (general) students in Grades 1-6 in most schools and in some schools in Grades 7-8, and is an elective subject in most schools in Grades 7-12. General music classes in the U.S. are similar to compulsory music classes in many other countries. Approximately 25 percent of American public secondary school students participate in elective music performing ensembles, which are a distinctive and positive feature of American music education.

Created

Date Created
2016-01

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Classroom Observation Ability Among Pre-Service Music Educators in Greece

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom observation ability of pre-service music teachers in Greece (N = 62). Two groups of undergraduates, one near the beginning and

The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom observation ability of pre-service music teachers in Greece (N = 62). Two groups of undergraduates, one near the beginning and one near the end of a two-year course sequence in teaching methods that included in-class and in-school training in observation ("juniors" and "seniors," respectively), observed videotapes of one elementary (4th grade) and one secondary (8th grade) general music class, each being taught by its own expert music teacher. Subjects wrote comments that judges classified into subcategories within overall categories of lesson, teacher, and students. Results largely confirmed those of previous research from the USA, with the more experienced subjects making significantly more comments and both groups focusing more on teachers than on lessons or students. There were also differences between subcategories and significant intersections involving experience level and sex of the subjects.

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Created

Date Created
2010-02

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Multicultural and Popular Music Content in an American Music Teacher Education Program

Description

The teaching of multicultural music, and to a lesser extent popular music, has been the stated goal of music education policy makes for many decades. Accordingly, the purpose of this

The teaching of multicultural music, and to a lesser extent popular music, has been the stated goal of music education policy makes for many decades. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to estimate the amount and percentage of time music education majors in a university teacher education program spent on 13 styles of music in history, theory and performance courses during a four-year program, both in and out of class. Subjects were the entire population of undergraduate pre-service music teachers from one large university music school in the southwestern United States (N = 80). Estimates were provided by the course instructors. Subjects spent widely disparate amounts of time on musics of the western art (92.83%), western non-art (6.94%), and non-western (.23), with little time (.54%) devoted to popular music. The discussion centers on solutions sometimes proffered for musically unbalanced music teacher education programs, implications relative to accreditation and national music standards in the USA, and changes implemented by the institution under study.

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Created

Date Created
2009-02