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Latino children are more than twice as likely to live in poverty than their non-Latino, White peers (Kids Count Data Center, 2017), yet limited work has aimed to understand neighborhood

Latino children are more than twice as likely to live in poverty than their non-Latino, White peers (Kids Count Data Center, 2017), yet limited work has aimed to understand neighborhood influences on pathways of mental health among Latino children. Substantial work documents the deleterious effects of living in a disadvantaged neighborhood on mental health outcomes throughout the lifespan (Leventhal & Brooks-Gunn, 2000). Parental and familial variables may explain neighborhood influences on children’s mental health during the first few years of life (May, Azar, & Matthews, 2018).

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Date Created
  • 2019
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  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.A., Arizona State University, 2019
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 69-75)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Psychology

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    by Sarah Curci

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