Description

Coming out from under the shadow of sight, blindness has a story to tell. From Tiresias to The Miracle Worker, literary and visual representations of blindness are cornerstones of compelling

Coming out from under the shadow of sight, blindness has a story to tell. From Tiresias to The Miracle Worker, literary and visual representations of blindness are cornerstones of compelling tales of loss and overcoming. In support of the inherent value of sight, these conventional narratives overshadow the stories and lived experiences of blind people themselves. In light of this misrepresentation, I explore what it means to read, write, and see blindness, as well as consider the implications of being blind in present-day Latin America.

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Contributors
Date Created
  • 2018
Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2018
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 124-130)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • English and Spanish
      Note type
      language
    • Field of study: Spanish

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by Rachel Newland

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