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For interspecific mutualisms, the behavior of one partner can influence the fitness of the other, especially in the case of symbiotic mutualisms where partners live in close physical association for

For interspecific mutualisms, the behavior of one partner can influence the fitness of the other, especially in the case of symbiotic mutualisms where partners live in close physical association for much of their lives. Behavioral effects on fitness may be particularly important if either species in these long-term relationships displays personality. Animal personality is defined as repeatable individual differences in behavior, and how correlations among these consistent traits are structured is termed behavioral syndromes.

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    Date Created
    • 2018
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2018
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 130-139)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Biology

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    by Peter Marting

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