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How do trees (live and representational) participate in our theatrical and performed encounters with them? If trees are not inherently scenic, as their treatment in language and on stage might

How do trees (live and representational) participate in our theatrical and performed encounters with them? If trees are not inherently scenic, as their treatment in language and on stage might reinforce, how can they be retheorized as agents and participants in dramatic encounters? Using Diana Taylor’s theory of scenario to understand embodied encounters, I propose an alternative approach to understanding environmental beings (like trees) called “synercentrism,” which takes as its central tenet the active, if not 100 percent “willed,” participation of both human and non-human beings.

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    Date Created
    • 2018
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2018
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 315-332)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Theatre

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    by Megan Laura De Roover

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