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This thesis argues for the utility of syntactic cartography in representing and analyzing the disputed language of legal statutes. It presents an analysis of two appellate court cases, Flores-Figueroa v.

This thesis argues for the utility of syntactic cartography in representing and analyzing the disputed language of legal statutes. It presents an analysis of two appellate court cases, Flores-Figueroa v. United States (2009) and In re Sanders (2008). Each case involves a difference of opinion with respect to the position and function of prepositions found in 18 U.S.C. § 1028A(a)(1) and 11 U.S.C. § 1328(f), respectively.

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    Date Created
    • 2017
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  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.A., Arizona State University, 2017
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 75-81)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by Justin Bruce Petersen

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