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Decades of research in cyberpsychology and human-computer interaction has pointed to a strong distinction between the online and offline worlds, suggesting that attitudes and behaviors in one domain do not

Decades of research in cyberpsychology and human-computer interaction has pointed to a strong distinction between the online and offline worlds, suggesting that attitudes and behaviors in one domain do not necessarily generalize to the other. However, as humans spend increasing amounts of time in the digital world, psychological understandings of safety may begin to influence human perceptions of threat while online. This dissertation therefore examines whether perceived threat generalizes between domains across archival, correlational, and experimental research methods.

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    Date Created
    • 2017
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2017
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 98-106)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Psychology

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    by Jessica E. Bodford

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