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Affiliative touch, such as physical affection between relationship partners, activates neural systems associated with reward, relaxation, and attachment. Co-sleeping is a common practice among romantic partners, and the social context

Affiliative touch, such as physical affection between relationship partners, activates neural systems associated with reward, relaxation, and attachment. Co-sleeping is a common practice among romantic partners, and the social context of sleep is linked to well-being. The effect of touch during sleep, however, remains largely untested. As a first study, 210 married couples were asked how much they generally touched during sleep and how important it was for them to touch during sleep.

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    Date Created
    • 2017
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2017
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 20-23)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Psychology

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    by Shiza Shahid

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