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Since the 1960’s and 1970’s, ethnographic research on Jewish menstrual rituals known as niddah, Taharat HaMishpacha, or Family Purity has associated their practices with religious behavior. Much of this research

Since the 1960’s and 1970’s, ethnographic research on Jewish menstrual rituals known as niddah, Taharat HaMishpacha, or Family Purity has associated their practices with religious behavior. Much of this research organizes around questions of women’s agency within ostensibly patriarchally constructed religious practices that carry the potential to oppress its women practitioners.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.A., Arizona State University, 2016
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 146-152)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Religious studies

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    by Isobel-Marie Johnston

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