Description

In The Queen of Technicolor, poems draw from the lives of Mexican-Americans as immigrants and their experience of otherness. Facets of a more complex identity—assimilation, language, and a shared human

In The Queen of Technicolor, poems draw from the lives of Mexican-Americans as immigrants and their experience of otherness. Facets of a more complex identity—assimilation, language, and a shared human experience—are woven to suggest the need for recognition. The poems are set in the Southwestern United States borderlands as well as Mexico during present day but with a layer of narrative reaching back to the 1940’s and the 1910 Mexican Revolution.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
    Subjects
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.F.A., Arizona State University, 2016
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Creative writing

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    by Jacqueline Balderrama

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