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Modern aircraft are expected to fly faster and more efficiently than their predecessors. To improve aerodynamic efficiency, designers must carefully consider and handle shock wave formation. Presently, many designers utilize

Modern aircraft are expected to fly faster and more efficiently than their predecessors. To improve aerodynamic efficiency, designers must carefully consider and handle shock wave formation. Presently, many designers utilize computationally heavy optimization methods to design wings. While these methods may work, they do not provide insight. This thesis aims to better understand fundamental methods that govern wing design. In order to further understand the flow in the transonic regime, this work revisits the Transonic Similarity Rule.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
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  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2016
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 68-69)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Aerospace engineering

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    by Jeffrey J Kirkman

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