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Aggression is inherently social. Evolutionary theories, for instance, suggest that the peer group within which an aggressor is embedded is of central importance to the use of aggression. However, there

Aggression is inherently social. Evolutionary theories, for instance, suggest that the peer group within which an aggressor is embedded is of central importance to the use of aggression. However, there is disagreement in the field with regard to understanding precisely how aggression and peer relationships should relate. As such, in a series of three empirical studies, my dissertation takes a relational approach and addresses some of the inconsistencies present in the extant literature.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2016
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 103-119)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Family and human development

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    by Naomi C. Z. Andrews

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