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Ethos or credibility of a speaker is often defined as the speaker's character (Aristotle). Contemporary scholars however, have contended that ethos lies with the audience because while the speaker may

Ethos or credibility of a speaker is often defined as the speaker's character (Aristotle). Contemporary scholars however, have contended that ethos lies with the audience because while the speaker may efficiently persuade, the audience will decide if it wants to be persuaded (Farrell). Missing from the scholarly conversation is attention to how ethos is performed between speaker and audience under institutional structures that produce inequitable power relations subject to changing political contexts over time.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2016
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 206-211)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    by Karen Lynn Ching Carter

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