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Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) were first imagined as a technology that would allow subjects to have direct communication with prosthetics and external devices (e.g. control over a computer cursor or robotic

Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) were first imagined as a technology that would allow subjects to have direct communication with prosthetics and external devices (e.g. control over a computer cursor or robotic arm movement). Operation of these devices was not automatic, and subjects needed calibration and training in order to master this control. In short, learning became a key component in controlling these systems.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 98-107)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Bioengineering

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    by Michelle Armenta Salas

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