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This study examines changing language loyalties of the sociopolitically most dominant ethnic group in Indonesia, the Javanese. Although Javanese language has the largest number of speakers, within the last five

This study examines changing language loyalties of the sociopolitically most dominant ethnic group in Indonesia, the Javanese. Although Javanese language has the largest number of speakers, within the last five decades the language is gradually losing its speakers who prioritize the national language, Indonesian. This phenomenon led me to inquire into the extent to which their native language matters for their Javanese identity and how the language planning and policy (LPP) mechanism works to foster Javanese language.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Vita
    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 395-413)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    by Lusia Marliana Nurani

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