Description

Sound localization can be difficult in a reverberant environment. Fortunately listeners can utilize various perceptual compensatory mechanisms to increase the reliability of sound localization when provided with ambiguous physical evidence.

Sound localization can be difficult in a reverberant environment. Fortunately listeners can utilize various perceptual compensatory mechanisms to increase the reliability of sound localization when provided with ambiguous physical evidence. For example, the directional information of echoes can be perceptually suppressed by the direct sound to achieve a single, fused auditory event in a process called the precedence effect (Litovsky et al., 1999). Visual cues also influence sound localization through a phenomenon known as the ventriloquist effect.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 26-28)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Bioengineering

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    by Christopher Montagne

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