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Scholars have attended to paradoxes inherent in wider public discourse where subordinated groups most affected by laws and sanctions have the least political, material, and rhetorical capital to speak back

Scholars have attended to paradoxes inherent in wider public discourse where subordinated groups most affected by laws and sanctions have the least political, material, and rhetorical capital to speak back to them. Such scholarship often focuses either on the subordinated status of a group or the work of subordinated groups going public as part of a collective mass movement for social change. In doing so, scholarship risks undermining the agency of subordinated rhetors or treating mass-movement rhetoric as somehow both exceptional and yet necessary for enacting cultural citizenship.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-217)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    by Veronica Oliver

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