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Protectors who do harm are often punished more severely because their crime is perceived as a betrayal of trust. Two experiments test whether this will generalize to protectors who incur

Protectors who do harm are often punished more severely because their crime is perceived as a betrayal of trust. Two experiments test whether this will generalize to protectors who incur harm while serving in their protective role, and if not, whether collective guilt for the harm they suffered provides an explanation. Study 1 tested competing hypotheses that a veteran (versus civilian) with PTSD would be punished either more harshly because of the trust betrayal, or more leniently because of increased guilt about the harm the veteran suffered during war.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 32-36)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Psychology

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    by Alexander Charles Jay

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