Description

When consumers make experiential purchases, they often have to decide between experiences that contain many or few features. Contrary to prior research demonstrating that consumers prefer feature-rich products before consumption

When consumers make experiential purchases, they often have to decide between experiences that contain many or few features. Contrary to prior research demonstrating that consumers prefer feature-rich products before consumption but feature-poor products after consumption, the author reveals a reversal of this effect for experiences. Specifically, the author hypothesizes and finds that consumers prefer feature-poor experiences before consumption (a phenomenon denoted as `feature apprehension') but prefer feature-rich experiences after consumption.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 45-48)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Business administration

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    by Chadwick Justin Miller

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