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Neuroimaging has appeared in the courtroom as a type of `evidence' to support claims about whether or not criminals should be held accountable for their crimes. Yet the ability to

Neuroimaging has appeared in the courtroom as a type of `evidence' to support claims about whether or not criminals should be held accountable for their crimes. Yet the ability to abstract notions of culpability and criminal behavior with confidence from these imagines is unclear. As there remains much to be discovered in the relationship between personal responsibility, criminal behavior, and neurological abnormalities, questions have been raised toward neuroimaging as an appropriate means to validate these claims.

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    Date Created
    • 2014
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2014
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 54-56)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Criminology

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by Sarah Taddeo

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