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Students' ability to regulate and control their behaviors during learning has been shown to be a critical skill for academic success. However, researchers often struggle with ways to capture the

Students' ability to regulate and control their behaviors during learning has been shown to be a critical skill for academic success. However, researchers often struggle with ways to capture the nuances of this ability, often solely relying on self-report measures. This thesis proposal employs a novel approach to investigating variations in students' ability to self-regulate by using process data from the game-based Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) iSTART-ME.

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    Date Created
    • 2014
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.A., Arizona State University, 2014
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 79-87)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Psychology

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    Erica L. Snow

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