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The medieval bestiary is often simply described as a moralized "encyclopedia of animals," however, these so-called "books of beasts" were made for humans, by humans, about humans. It is therefore

The medieval bestiary is often simply described as a moralized "encyclopedia of animals," however, these so-called "books of beasts" were made for humans, by humans, about humans. It is therefore surprising that one common pictorial subject of the bestiary has been left unexamined: humans. By viewing bestiary images through this lens, one may easily see man's underlying and unresolved struggle to maintain dominance over the beasts, and the Others projected onto them, thereby ensuring that "the (hu)man" remains a discrete definition.

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    Date Created
    • 2014
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: M.A., Arizona State University, 2014
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 89-100)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Art history

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    by Susan Anderson

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