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This dissertation explores complex representations of spiritual, social and cultural ways of knowing embedded within engraved ivory drill bows from the Bering Strait. During the nineteenth century, multi-faceted ivory drill

This dissertation explores complex representations of spiritual, social and cultural ways of knowing embedded within engraved ivory drill bows from the Bering Strait. During the nineteenth century, multi-faceted ivory drill bows formed an ideal surface on which to recount life events and indigenous epistemologies reflective of distinct environmental and socio-cultural relationships. Carvers added motifs over time and the presence of multiple hands suggests a passing down of these objects as a form of familial history and cultural patrimony.

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    Date Created
    • 2013
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2013
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 478-507)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • English and Inuit
      Note type
      language
    • Field of study: Art

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    by Amy Chan

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