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Generativity was first described by Erikson (1963) as an adult's concern for and commitment to promoting the welfare and development of future generations. Generativity is juxtaposed by stagnation in Erikson's

Generativity was first described by Erikson (1963) as an adult's concern for and commitment to promoting the welfare and development of future generations. Generativity is juxtaposed by stagnation in Erikson's stage of midlife (35-65 years old). The developmental hurdle faced at this point in the developmental cycle is whether a person will produce something of real value, both in the present and impacting future generations. Generative adults seek to give something back to society, generally behaving in a way to make the world a better place for others with no personal gain attached.

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    Date Created
    • 2013
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2013
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 67-70)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Counseling psychology

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by David Hauser

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