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Professional environmental scientists are increasingly under pressure to inform and even shape policy. Scientists engage policy effectively when they act within the bounds of objectivity, credibility, and authority, yet significant

Professional environmental scientists are increasingly under pressure to inform and even shape policy. Scientists engage policy effectively when they act within the bounds of objectivity, credibility, and authority, yet significant portions of the scientific community condemn such acts as advocacy. They argue that it is nonobjective, that it risks damaging the credibility of science, and that it is an abuse of authority. This means objectivity, credibility, and authority deserve direct attention before the policy advocacy quagmire can be reasonably understood.

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    Date Created
    • 2012
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2012
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 106-113)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Environmental social science

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by Caroline Appleton

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