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Approximately 1.7 million people in the United States are living with limb loss and are in need of more sophisticated devices that better mimic human function. In the Human Machine

Approximately 1.7 million people in the United States are living with limb loss and are in need of more sophisticated devices that better mimic human function. In the Human Machine Integration Laboratory, a powered, transtibial prosthetic ankle was designed and build that allows a person to regain ankle function with improved ankle kinematics and kinetics. The ankle allows a person to walk normally and up and down stairs, but volitional control is still an issue. This research tackled the problem of giving the user more control over the prosthetic ankle using a force/torque circuit.

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    Date Created
    • 2012
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2012
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 54-57)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Bioengineering

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    by Adam Fronczyk

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