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Acquisition of fluorescence via autocatalytic processes is unique to few proteins in the natural world. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been integral to live-cell imaging techniques for decades; however, mechanistic information

Acquisition of fluorescence via autocatalytic processes is unique to few proteins in the natural world. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been integral to live-cell imaging techniques for decades; however, mechanistic information is still emerging fifty years after the discovery of the original green fluorescent protein (GFP). Modification of the fluorescence properties of the proteins derived from GFP allows increased complexity of experiments and consequently, information content of the data acquired. The importance of arginine-96 in GFP has been widely discussed.

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    Date Created
    • 2012
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2012
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 57-61)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Chemistry

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    by Jennifer L. Watkins

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