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A major problem faced by electric utilities is the need to meet electric loads during certain times of peak demand. One of the widely adopted and promising programs is demand

A major problem faced by electric utilities is the need to meet electric loads during certain times of peak demand. One of the widely adopted and promising programs is demand response (DR) where building owners are encouraged, by way of financial incentives, to reduce their electric loads during a few hours of the day when the electric utility is likely to encounter peak loads. In this thesis, we investigate the effect of various DR measures and their resulting indoor occupant comfort implications, on two prototype commercial buildings in the hot and dry climate of Phoenix, AZ.

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    Date Created
    • 2012
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2012
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 68-69)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Built environmental (Energy performance & climate responsive architecture)

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    by Amruta Khanolkar

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