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In the search for chemical biosensors designed for patient-based physiological applications, non-invasive diagnostic approaches continue to have value. The work described in this thesis builds upon previous breath analysis

In the search for chemical biosensors designed for patient-based physiological applications, non-invasive diagnostic approaches continue to have value. The work described in this thesis builds upon previous breath analysis studies. In particular, it seeks to assess the adsorptive mechanisms active in both acetone and ethanol biosensors designed for breath analysis. The thermoelectric biosensors under investigation were constructed using a thermopile for transduction and four different materials for biorecognition.

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    Date Created
    • 2011
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  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2011
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 55-57)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Bioengineering

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    by Kimberly Wilson

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