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This dissertation investigates socio-economic strategies adopted by a small craftworking community situated on the edge of one of the earliest, largest and most complex cities in Mesoamerica. The focus of

This dissertation investigates socio-economic strategies adopted by a small craftworking community situated on the edge of one of the earliest, largest and most complex cities in Mesoamerica. The focus of investigation is San Jose 520, a hamlet located on the southeastern margin of Teotihuacan and occupied primarily during the Tlamimilolpa and Xolalpan phases (ca. A.D. 200-500). Its inhabitants were potters of low socio-economic status living in small, architecturally simple residential structures.

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    Date Created
    • 2011
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2011
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 314-376)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Anthropology

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    by Mercedes Oralia Cabrera Cortés

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