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Though some scholars have written about place and history, few have pursued the use of place theory in length in relation to the connections between race, religion, and national identity.

Though some scholars have written about place and history, few have pursued the use of place theory in length in relation to the connections between race, religion, and national identity. Using the writings in the United States and Louisiana in the years surrounding the Louisiana Purchase, I explore place-making and othering processes. U.S. leaders influenced by the Second Great Awakening viewed New Orleans as un-American in its religion and seemingly ambiguous race relations. New Orleanian Catholics viewed the U.S.

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    Date Created
    • 2011
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.A., Arizona State University, 2011
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 92-99)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Religious studies

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    by Stephanie Bilinsky

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