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This dissertation explores the rhetorical significance of persecution claims produced by demonstrably powerful publics in contemporary American culture. This ideological criticism is driven by several related research questions. First, how

This dissertation explores the rhetorical significance of persecution claims produced by demonstrably powerful publics in contemporary American culture. This ideological criticism is driven by several related research questions. First, how do members of apparently powerful groups (men, whites, and Christians) come to see themselves as somehow unjustly marginalized, persecuted, or powerless? Second, how are these discourses related to the public sphere and counterpublicity?

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    Date Created
    • 2011
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2011
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-253)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Communication studies

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by Christopher Duerringer

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