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The evolution of cooperation is a fundamental problem in biology, especially for non-relatives, where indirect fitness benefits cannot counter within-group inequalities. Multilevel selection models show how cooperation can evolve if

The evolution of cooperation is a fundamental problem in biology, especially for non-relatives, where indirect fitness benefits cannot counter within-group inequalities. Multilevel selection models show how cooperation can evolve if it generates a group-level advantage, even when cooperators are disadvantaged within their group. This allows the possibility of group selection, but few examples have been described in nature. Here we show that group selection can explain the evolution of cooperative nest founding in the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus.

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    Date Created
    • 2016-07-28
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    • Digital object identifier: 10.1038/srep29828
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1838-7640
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    Shaffer, Z., Sasaki, T., Haney, B., Janssen, M., Pratt, S. C., & Fewell, J. H. (2016). The foundress’s dilemma: group selection for cooperation among queens of the harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex californicus. Scientific Reports, 6(1). doi:10.1038/srep29828

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