Description

The majority of trust research has focused on the benefits trust can have for individual actors, institutions, and organizations. This “optimistic bias” is particularly evident in work focused on institutional

The majority of trust research has focused on the benefits trust can have for individual actors, institutions, and organizations. This “optimistic bias” is particularly evident in work focused on institutional trust, where concepts such as procedural justice, shared values, and moral responsibility have gained prominence. But trust in institutions may not be exclusively good. We reveal implications for the “dark side” of institutional trust by reviewing relevant theories and empirical research that can contribute to a more holistic understanding.

377.61 KB application/pdf

Download count: 0

Details

Contributors
Date Created
  • 2016
Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Identifier
    • Identifier Value
      http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319222608

    Citation and reuse

    Cite this item

    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Neal, T.M.S., Shockley, E., & Schilke, O. (2016). The “dark side” of institutional trust. In E. Shockley, T.M.S. Neal, B.H. Bornstein, & L.M. PytlikZillig (Eds.), Interdisciplinary perspectives on trust: Towards theoretical and methodological integration (pp. 177-192). NY: Springer.

    Machine-readable links