Description

The purpose of this thesis was to explore how changes in the geometry of a bifurcating cerebral aneurysm will affect the hemodynamics in idealized models after stent treatment. This thesis

The purpose of this thesis was to explore how changes in the geometry of a bifurcating cerebral aneurysm will affect the hemodynamics in idealized models after stent treatment. This thesis explores the use of a computationally modeled Enterprise Vascular Reconstruction Device (Cordis, East Bridgewater, NJ), a high porosity and closed cell design. The models represent idealized cases of saccular aneurysms with dome sizes of either 4mm or 6mm and a dome to neck ratio of either 3:2 or 2:1. Two aneurysm contact angles are studied, one at 45 degrees and the other at 90 degrees. The stent was characterized and deployed with the use of Finite Element Analysis into each model. Computational Fluid Dynamic principles were applied in series of simulations on treated and untreated models. Data was gathered in the neck plane for the average velocity magnitude, root mean squared velocity, average flow vector angle of deflection, and the cross neck flow rate. Within the aneurysm, the average velocity magnitude, root mean squared velocity, and average pressure were calculated. Additionally, the mass flow rate at each outlet was recorded. The results of this study indicate that the Enterprise Stent was most effective in the sharper, 90 degree geometry of Model 3. Additionally, the stent had an adverse effect on the Models 1 and 4, which had the smallest neck sizes. Conclusions are that the Enterprise Stent, as a stand-alone treatment method is only reliable in situations that take advantage of its design.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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