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Improving medical aerosols is the multifaceted objective that is the overarching theme of this work. This thesis is the culmination of many hours of academic research. It details the current

Improving medical aerosols is the multifaceted objective that is the overarching theme of this work. This thesis is the culmination of many hours of academic research. It details the current mechanical and physiological obstacles of state of the art drug inhalation technology, as well as provides a detailed guide of the experimental set up, procedure, analysis and background for the charge neutralization experiments performed by the author. The findings of this research are that inhalation devices need to become personalized; meaning adjustable flow rates, particle sizes, and charge levels. To improve the efficiency of lung deposition they could use MRI to take advantage of 3D modeling software to make transport models of an individual patient's lungs. This model would allow an engineer to calculate the air velocity in each passage of the respiratory system and would account for any pulmonary obstructions that would completely alter the deposition pattern from the average healthy patient. With the velocity profile of the lung a doctor could formulate an aerosol with the perfect attributed for the most targeted delivery. For the experiments performed in this work the following results were obtained. The ionization of air by polonium 210 alpha particles is dependent on the distance from the alpha emitting source and the strength of the electric field. Furthermore discharge of aerosol droplets is possible through volume conduction however the mass of the polonium 210 isotope must be proportional to the ionization current demand.

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