"Can I Consider You My Friend?" Moving Beyond One-Sided Conversation in Social Robotics

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Description
As people begin to live longer and the population shifts to having more olderadults on Earth than young children, radical solutions will be needed to ease the burden on society. It will be essential to develop technology that can age with

As people begin to live longer and the population shifts to having more olderadults on Earth than young children, radical solutions will be needed to ease the burden on society. It will be essential to develop technology that can age with the individual. One solution is to keep older adults in their homes longer through smart home and smart living technology, allowing them to age in place. People have many choices when choosing where to age in place, including their own homes, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, or family members. No matter where people choose to age, they may face isolation and financial hardships. It is crucial to keep finances in mind when developing Smart Home technology. Smart home technologies seek to allow individuals to stay inside their homes for as long as possible, yet little work looks at how we can use technology in different life stages. Robots are poised to impact society and ease burns at home and in the workforce. Special attention has been given to social robots to ease isolation. As social robots become accepted into society, researchers need to understand how these robots should mimic natural conversation. My work attempts to answer this question within social robotics by investigating how to make conversational robots natural and reciprocal. I investigated this through a 2x2 Wizard of Oz between-subjects user study. The study lasted four months, testing four different levels of interactivity with the robot. None of the levels were significantly different from the others, an unexpected result. I then investigated the robot’s personality, the participant’s trust, and the participant’s acceptance of the robot and how that influenced the study.
Date Created
2022
Agent

Social Network Attributes and Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Behaviors Among Young Adults in a Diabetes Related Social Group

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Description

Young adults with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) face unique challenges in managing their chronic disease. While simultaneously navigating major life transitions and becoming fully responsible for their diabetes-self management behaviors (DSMB), social support can be an integral part of

Young adults with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) face unique challenges in managing their chronic disease. While simultaneously navigating major life transitions and becoming fully responsible for their diabetes-self management behaviors (DSMB), social support can be an integral part of disease management. Many young adults enroll in college where student organizations are prevalent including diabetes related social groups on some campuses, which provide a rich source of social support for students with diabetes as they transition to greater independence in diabetes management. This study used descriptive analysis and personal network analysis (PNA) to investigate which aspects of being a part of a diabetes related social group and personal networks, in general, are pertinent to successful diabetes management, measured by a Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) among 52 young adults with T1DM. The majority of respondents indicated that since being a part of College Diabetes Network (CDN) or another diabetes-related social group, they increased time spent paying attention to, and felt more empowered to make changes to their diabetes management routine, and they were able to generally take better care of their diabetes. Half of respondents noticed their health improved since joining, and over half felt less burdened by their diabetes. Though no personal network measures were highly correlated with higher Diabetes Self-Management Scores, the degree to which health matters were discussed within their personal network was the most associated personal network measure. Our findings help contextualize the ways in which young adults’ DSMB are influenced by participation in diabetes- related social groups, as well as introduce the use of personal network analysis in gauging important aspects of social capital and support in young adults with chronic disease.

Date Created
2021-05
Agent

Social Network Attributes and Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management Behaviors Among Young Adults in a Diabetes Related Social Group

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Description

Young adults with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) face unique challenges in managing their chronic disease. While simultaneously navigating major life transitions and becoming fully responsible for their diabetes-self management behaviors (DSMB), social support can be an integral part of

Young adults with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) face unique challenges in managing their chronic disease. While simultaneously navigating major life transitions and becoming fully responsible for their diabetes-self management behaviors (DSMB), social support can be an integral part of disease management. Many young adults enroll in college where student organizations are prevalent including diabetes related social groups on some campuses, which provide a rich source of social support for students with diabetes as they transition to greater independence in diabetes management. This study used descriptive analysis and personal network analysis (PNA) to investigate which aspects of being a part of a diabetes related social group and personal networks, in general, are pertinent to successful diabetes management, measured by a Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) among 52 young adults with T1DM. The majority of respondents indicated that since being a part of College Diabetes Network (CDN) or another diabetes-related social group, they increased time spent paying attention to, and felt more empowered to make changes to their diabetes management routine, and they were able to generally take better care of their diabetes. Half of respondents noticed their health improved since joining, and over half felt less burdened by their diabetes. Though no personal network measures were highly correlated with higher Diabetes Self-Management Scores, the degree to which health matters were discussed within their personal network was the most associated personal network measure. Our findings help contextualize the ways in which young adults’ DSMB are influenced by participation in diabetes- related social groups, as well as introduce the use of personal network analysis in gauging important aspects of social capital and support in young adults with chronic disease.

Date Created
2021-05
Agent