Serving Realness: Exploring and Documenting Ballroom Kiki Culture, Community, and Gender in Arizona

193328-Thumbnail Image.png
Description
The Kiki scene, an autonomous youth subculture within the broader House Ballroom community, has recently emerged in Arizona, serving as a critical space for Black and Latinx LGBTQIA+ individuals to find belonging, resistance, and creative self-expression. Amidst Arizona's sociopolitical landscape,

The Kiki scene, an autonomous youth subculture within the broader House Ballroom community, has recently emerged in Arizona, serving as a critical space for Black and Latinx LGBTQIA+ individuals to find belonging, resistance, and creative self-expression. Amidst Arizona's sociopolitical landscape, where transgender identities face legal discrimination, Kiki house members navigate complex intersections of identity, community building, and gender performance. This dissertation explores the lived experiences, perceptions, and aspirations of the Arizona Ballroom Kiki community through Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), Participatory Action Research (PAR), autoethnography, and qualitative interviews. The first paper employs autoethnography to examine the researcher's personal journey as a white non-binary transmasculine individual navigating identity and gender expression within the predominantly Black and Latinx LGBTQIA+ Ballroom Kiki scene, a community that embraces femininity in all its diverse forms. The second paper presents findings from semi-structured interviews with members of two Kiki houses, uncovering themes related to their perceptions of Ballroom culture, aspirations for representing their stories, and concerns in working with researchers, such as cultural appropriation and misrepresentation. The Arizona Ballroom Kiki scene is a testament to the resilience, creativity, and talent of its members, who have built a thriving community despite facing numerous challenges. The third paper examines the application of CBPR and PAR methodologies through themes developed from focus group interviews with Kiki house members, discussing ethical and practical considerations of conducting collaborative research with marginalized LGBTQIA+ communities. Key findings underscore the importance of honoring the history and legacy of Ballroom, cultural preservation, authentic representation, community agency, empowerment, and equitable tangible benefits for the community and its members. The study highlights the transformative potential of the Ballroom scene in fostering resilience, creativity, and social change while addressing the challenges of navigating power dynamics and the potential for unintended harm from the actions of researchers, policymakers, and society at large. By centering the voices and experiences of the Arizona Ballroom Kiki community, this research contributes to understanding the sociocultural significance of Ballroom culture and its impact on LGBTQIA+ People of Color, emphasizing the need for inclusive, participatory, and empowering approaches in documenting and supporting marginalized communities.
Date Created
2024
Agent

The Different Tactics of Educating the Population About Skin Cancer

Description
In the United States, the most common type of cancer is skin cancer. The most common forms of skin cancer are: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. There are numerous organizations that have created awareness campaigns to inform

In the United States, the most common type of cancer is skin cancer. The most common forms of skin cancer are: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. There are numerous organizations that have created awareness campaigns to inform the public about the risks of skin cancer and the methods that they can use to protect themselves. The organizations analyzed in this paper were: Melanoma Education Foundation, Melanoma Research Foundation, AIM at Melanoma Foundation, Melanoma Research Alliance, The Skin Cancer Foundation, and The American Cancer Society. After an analysis of the organizations’ skin cancer prevention methods, three themes were developed. These themes consist of: “Self Awareness”, “Nothing is Perfect”, and “Language of Prevention Techniques”. The articles informed the public that they needed to make a conscious effort to protect their skin, and even with the proper protection methods it is still possible to be diagnosed with skin cancer. The goal of informing the public about the risks of skin cancer was achieved, and it was done in a specific manner.
Date Created
2024-05
Agent

Documenting Realities of a Multilingual Family with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Using a Behavior Logging App: A Linguistic Ethnographic Case Study

187590-Thumbnail Image.png
Description
The prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) has resulted in research on treatment efficacy, lending itself to quantitative analyses. In contrast, ethnographic studies have offered the benefits of analyzing lived experiences and exploring the uniqueness of ASD individuals. Using the

The prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) has resulted in research on treatment efficacy, lending itself to quantitative analyses. In contrast, ethnographic studies have offered the benefits of analyzing lived experiences and exploring the uniqueness of ASD individuals. Using the Linguistic Ethnography (LE) perspective, this case study investigates the connection between multilingual practices, behavior management, and behavior-logging app usage. It looks at one cross-cultural family (Indonesian-Belgian) with two children diagnosed with autism. Multimodal data were collected for ten weeks virtually and five weeks in the family’s home in Belgium. The data collection focused on the family's multilingual and behavior management practices and specifically on mobile app usage to document the behaviors of the non-verbal son. Analytical frameworks were drawn from Multimodal Ethnography (Dicks et al., 2006) and Multimodal Discourse Analysis (Kress, 2011a). The findings indicated that linguistic and cultural diversity, both internally and externally, caused a layer of complexity in attending to a non-verbal child. The case study showed positive outcomes of multilingualism. However, it highlighted the struggle of building consistent communication between family members and health professionals, which affected the effort to find a successful treatment plan. The behavior logging app helped parents identify parts of the son’s behaviors and reflect on their behavior management strategies. However, it also underscored the real-life challenges of documentation. In this case, mobile technology may be more useful when supported by health professionals. Although the case study notes family successes, it calls attention to the extraordinary realities of cross-cultural ASD families that need more representation through ethnographic research.
Date Created
2023
Agent

Latina Mormons’ Migration, Marriage, and Motherhood Experiences in the U.S. Southwest

187416-Thumbnail Image.png
Description
Women of Latin American descent comprise at least 20% of the nearly seventeen million members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (also known as the Mormon or LDS Church). This dissertation study examines the lives of 69

Women of Latin American descent comprise at least 20% of the nearly seventeen million members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (also known as the Mormon or LDS Church). This dissertation study examines the lives of 69 Latina immigrant Mormon mothers living in the U.S. Southwest. With qualitative interviews, participant observation, and Photovoice (community-driven, participant-based photo collection), I investigated how race, ethnicity, gender, geography, legal status, and religion shape women's migration, marriage, and mothering decisions. Chapter One shows how Latina immigrants experienced ethno-racial belonging, exclusion, and social positionality. An "ethnoreligious hybridity" concept explains how Latinas adopted Mormonism alongside their racial and ethnic identities. Chapter Two examines participants' perceptions within Spanish-speaking LDS congregations. Latina Mormons perceived these worship spaces as beneficial for social networking, cultural preservation, and family support. There were tensions among LDS Latinx due to class differences, colorism, migration statuses, and historical political climates. I coined “congregational heterophily” to describe this congregational heterogeneity and diversity. Chapter Three examines women's dating and marriage practices by race, class, and immigration status. The Mormon Latinas in my study preferred marriage to other Latinos or co-ethnics. Ethnocentrism, racism, and gendered expectations can strain pan ethnic Latinx LDS partnerships. Another third had married white Mormon men. The relationship between Latinas and their white in-laws was often fraught with racial aggression and cultural clashes. Across Chapter Four, I examine how immigration status, culture, and race affect women's mothering. Latina Mormons is expected to be devout church members who excel at motherhood. Women felt pressure to provide social, spiritual, and financial support even after their children were adults. As a result of intersectional disadvantages caused by race, legal status, and gender, Latina Mormon immigrants experience increased maternal stress. Leaders, church members, and other mothers stigmatize Latinas when they do not meet church and motherhood expectations. I used "matriarchal policing” to describe these religious pressures and frequent social monitoring. Collectively, the results of this ethnographic study challenge stereotypes about Mormonism and add to academic knowledge about gendered migration, marriage, and motherhood while providing institutional and community solutions.
Date Created
2023
Agent

Outside the Binary: A Narrative Analysis of Bi- and Pansexual Coming Out Videos Online

168615-Thumbnail Image.png
Description
Much of the literature around coming out narratives is concerned with monosexual coming out experiences. While some recent literature has expanded to include discussions of non-monosexual experiences, there is a lack of research surrounding the coming out narratives of non-monosexual

Much of the literature around coming out narratives is concerned with monosexual coming out experiences. While some recent literature has expanded to include discussions of non-monosexual experiences, there is a lack of research surrounding the coming out narratives of non-monosexual individuals specifically. This thesis aims to investigate such coming out narratives. The coming out narrative genre as a whole has been examined by several researchers across several years, highlighting a variety of monosexual coming out experiences. This project aims to utilize past research of coming out narratives to build a framework of common themes within the genre and employ this framework as a basis of comparison between monosexual and non-monosexual coming out narratives. Since the experiences of non-monosexual members of the queer community are not being looked at within the coming out narrative genre, it is crucial to highlight non-monosexual experiences in narrative research such as this. Data for this study comes from several publicly available online coming out narratives from YouTube, with the final total equaling 12 narratives. This study finds that there are distinct differences between the coming out narratives of monosexual and non-monosexual narratives and, as such, provides evidence of unique lived experiences for non-monosexual individuals when coming out.
Date Created
2022
Agent

"It's Always A Part Of You and Aloha ʻĀina": Sacred Spaces and Indigenous/Aboriginal People’s Health

161817-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

Background: Indigenous/Aboriginal People (IAP) since the beginning of colonization have fought for their inherent rights to follow their way of life. They continue to face mistreatment for their beliefs and on the sacred spaces that are apart of them. The

Background: Indigenous/Aboriginal People (IAP) since the beginning of colonization have fought for their inherent rights to follow their way of life. They continue to face mistreatment for their beliefs and on the sacred spaces that are apart of them. The purpose of this dissertation is to share how the desecration of sacred spaces impacts Indigenous/Aboriginal Peoples’ health. Two research studies were designed to better understand how Indigenous/Aboriginal Peoples’ health is affected when their sacred spaces are desecrated. Methods: The first research study was conducted in Arizona, and Hawaiʻi with eight participants who are members of American Indian nations and Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian). The first study focused on sacred spaces in general, with some additional focus on the San Francisco Peaks (Nuvtukya’ovi in Hopi) and Mauna A Wākea. The second study was conducted virtually with seven Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) and focused solely on Mauna a Wākea. Qualitative data collection was through key informant interviews. Qualitative data analysis centered on a thematic analysis characterizing sacred spaces, and the ways in which participants explained how different forms of sacred space desecration impact IAP health. The analysis included the relationship IAP have with sacred spaces, and how their health is connected to sacred spaces. Results: The first qualitative study found that desecrating sacred spaces negatively impacts Indigenous/Aboriginal Peoples’ cultural identity and health. The second study found that participants are connected to sacred spaces, including having a loving relationship with and responsibility to sacred spaces. Conclusions: The conclusions from the study show that Indigenous/Aboriginal Peoples’ health is negatively impacted when their sacred spaces are desecrated, because their relationship to the sacred space is a part of their cultural identity. IAP’s relationship with sacred spaces is one filled with love and the responsibility to care for them. Sacred spaces also heal and maintain IAP health. For the future public health implications, laws and policies need to be upheld and created to protect IAP’s health rights and their sacred spaces.

Date Created
2021
Agent

We are the Bridge and We are the Gap: Black Women's Sisterhood as a Practice to Increase Health Status

161532-Thumbnail Image.png
Description
Over the last four centuries, Black women have been overwhelmingly understood, imagined, and defined through a Eurocentric and oppressive lens. The Eurocentric or white lens places pseudo-characteristics on Black women that inaccurately describe them. The qualities ascribed to Black women

Over the last four centuries, Black women have been overwhelmingly understood, imagined, and defined through a Eurocentric and oppressive lens. The Eurocentric or white lens places pseudo-characteristics on Black women that inaccurately describe them. The qualities ascribed to Black women are rooted in racial ideologies that benefit and progress the interest of White supremacy. This history has placed Black women in tension with institutionalized medicine, discouraging them from seeking or using healthcare resources. Without trust in a system positioned to heal, treat, and prevent health ailments, Black women cannot dialogue with those that are a part of that system. Paulo Freire argues that "dialogue is the encounter between men, mediated by the world, in order to name the world (Freire, 2000, p. 90)." By centering Black women and their voices, I envision (re)naming the world. Understanding how Black women from Lincoln County, Mississippi describe their health and bodies sheds light on their daily experiences that facilitate self-care, womanhood, and identity. This dissertation covers three related studies that are addressing: 1) how Black women from Mississippi see their bodies outside of deficit health, 2) how Black women’s sisterhood has been a collective effort to build womanhood and health, and how societal stereotypes can interfere or damage the progress of sisterhood, and 3) the importance of allowing for Black women’s ways of knowing to create liberatory data collection methods that represent who they are and their truth. I examine these dynamics using a mixed-methods approach including community-based participatory research and rapid ethnographic assessment sampling techniques (e.g., working with a community advisor), semi-structured interviews, Sister-girl Talks (focus groups), participant observation, and autoethnography. The results of the three-study mixed methods dissertation has both theoretical and practical implications for understanding the vital role that Black women need to play bring healing to their health in both healthcare settings (e.g., clinics) and healthcare planning (health evaluation programs and interventions.
Date Created
2021
Agent

Conceptualizing Toxicity in Women Twitch Streamers' Communities

161461-Thumbnail Image.png
Description
The livestreaming platform Twitch allows users to engage with one another and with content creators, known as streamers, in real-time, creating a cyclical pattern in which viewers and streamers simultaneously influence one another and co-construct the livestreams. While this active

The livestreaming platform Twitch allows users to engage with one another and with content creators, known as streamers, in real-time, creating a cyclical pattern in which viewers and streamers simultaneously influence one another and co-construct the livestreams. While this active engagement has resulted in numerous benefits, it has also led to a surge in toxic behavior – actions meant to disrupt the flow of the livestream and harm the streamer and viewers involved. Toxic behavior is often directed at individuals who do not conform to the norms of a space or community. Because Twitch evolved out of an interest in video game spectatorship, and video game culture is burdened by the gamer stereotype, which typecasts gamers as young, white, male, and cishet, Twitch users who do not fit this identity category (e.g., women; black, Indigenous and people of color [BIPOC]; queer people; etc.) are labeled as threats to the perceived homogeneity of video game (and Twitch) culture. This project examines toxic discourses surrounding three women Twitch streamers, considering how the streamers’ performances, community-building efforts, and methods of regulation impact the levels and types of toxicity in their livestreams. A critical technocultural discourse analysis of 30 hours of livestreaming data reveals diverse approaches to managing toxicity. While all three streamers expressed that they neither liked nor approved of toxic behavior, their methods of addressing it varied greatly, from active channel moderators and explicit rules to public acts of moderation. Furthermore, the manifestation of toxicity differed across the three streamers’ communities, signaling that the streamers’ strategies impact not only users’ willingness to engage in this behavior but also other viewers’ responses to this issue. Twitch’s positioning as a service provider, which places most of burden of regulating user behavior on streamers, further complicates this problem, as streamers are largely responsible for enforcing Twitch’s rules as well as their own, leading to disparate and conflicting social norms and enforcement patterns. This project underscores the need for Twitch and its streamers to create standardized methods of behavior regulation that are inclusive and hold users accountable for their behavior.
Date Created
2021
Agent

A Cross-Cultural Study of Parental Leave on Quality of Life between Finland, Japan, and The United States

Description

Managing a work-home balance is a daunting task for any parent. It is often difficult to take leave from work to care for one’s family due to financial barriers, which simultaneously poses a threat to family development. Although many countries

Managing a work-home balance is a daunting task for any parent. It is often difficult to take leave from work to care for one’s family due to financial barriers, which simultaneously poses a threat to family development. Although many countries have parental leave policies in place to account for this, effectiveness of these policies vary by country. This study aims to find to what extent parental leave has an impact on the quality of life. In this study, quality of life was investigated by the rank of the country on the Happiness Index and through the lens of achieving sustainable family development, which was subsequently described to be reflected by a country’s governmental resources provided during parental leave, as well as the country’s Gender Inequality Index. Through a cross-cultural review of literature, it was found that there seems to be an indirect, complex correlation of parental leave to the quality of life, and external factors such as sociocultural ideals, gender inequality, and varying workplace practices have greater significance on quality of life.

Date Created
2021-05
Agent

Love, Sex, & Dating During the COVID-19 Pandemic

148149-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

Sex, Love, & Dating During the COVID-19 Pandemic is a creative thesis project that addresses two main issues: 1) the overall lack of resources and information available to the public about how to proceed with respect to sex, love, and

Sex, Love, & Dating During the COVID-19 Pandemic is a creative thesis project that addresses two main issues: 1) the overall lack of resources and information available to the public about how to proceed with respect to sex, love, and dating during a global pandemic; and 2) my inability as director of Devils in the Bedroom (an on-campus sexual health club at ASU) to get condoms and other sexual health materials into the hands of students while in quarantine. A resource was developed, an informational pamphlet on the three main topics (sex, love, and dating), as well as a program to distribute the materials by mail, the sexual health care packages.

Date Created
2021-05
Agent