Matching Items (22)

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'What Makes Indians Laugh': Surrealism, Ritual and Return in Steven Yazzie and Joseph Beuys

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This paper traces the shift into performative interactions by European scholars and artists as they sought or feigned interaction with the spirits and objects of Native American culture. I discuss

This paper traces the shift into performative interactions by European scholars and artists as they sought or feigned interaction with the spirits and objects of Native American culture. I discuss the postwar artworks of Max Ernst, Joseph Beuys, and Steven Yazzie. I argue that each of these artists’ use of Native American objects goes beyond earlier surrealist appropriative and mimetic strategies. From a postcolonial position, these artworks address personal trauma as well as the collective trauma of colonialism. Aby Warburg’s late nineteenth-century travel to the American Southwest, and his resulting notion of an aesthetics of empathy, or of “mimesis through communion with/entering into the object,” becomes very relevant for Beuys’ work in particular. Furthermore these postwar artworks by Ernst, Beuys and Yazzie contain a comic element that invites laughter, a critical/therapeutic element that Pierre Clastres describes as a distinctly political act.

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  • 2012

Rethinking Conceptual Art

Rethinking Conceptual Art

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This book review considers three books on Conceptual Art that appeared in this year, by Anne Rorimer, Michael Newman and Jon Bird, and Rosalind Krauss. In 2011 this review was

This book review considers three books on Conceptual Art that appeared in this year, by Anne Rorimer, Michael Newman and Jon Bird, and Rosalind Krauss. In 2011 this review was distinguished as one of the most consulted in the history of caa.reviews; see Patricia Kelly, “2002,” at: http://www.caareviews.org/centennial/2002

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  • 2002

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A Tribute to the Women Among us

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I have conducted a creative that captures the power of women through an artistic perspective. The title of the creative project is “A Tribute to the Women Among us,” because

I have conducted a creative that captures the power of women through an artistic perspective. The title of the creative project is “A Tribute to the Women Among us,” because this project’s purpose is to express gratitude for the women that fought for the rights I have today, and for the women I encounter in marches, continuing the fight. I have taken photographs of women and children at women's marches in the United States and in France, yielding a total of 10 photographs I will be presenting at my defense, and printing out to sell. All the profits made from the photographs will be donated to planned parenthood.

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  • 2019-05

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Mapping Sustainable Concepts for Fashion Exhibition Development

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This thesis explores the relationship between sustainability, the fashion industry, and fashion exhibitions. Sustainability has been a driving force in the fashion industry in recent years as designers attempt to

This thesis explores the relationship between sustainability, the fashion industry, and fashion exhibitions. Sustainability has been a driving force in the fashion industry in recent years as designers attempt to combat staggering textile waste statistics in order to lessen the damage the industry has on the environment. Producers must rethink human engagement with nature based on a new ethic of ecosystem stewardship, which proposes that humans have ethical obligations to one another in their mutual relationship with non-human species and nature (Schmitz 13). Enhancing a socio-ecological perspective garners new ways of consuming and appreciating clothing design while focusing on lessening impacts on the environment through using less materials, reusing materials in new textile developments, and projecting a sustainable identity that can be followed by the public in order to be more conscious of spending habits, annual waste, and how sustainably ethical companies are. Removing natural resources or transforming landscapes to enhance human well-being paradoxically stands to diminish human well being over time (Schmitz 12), and this is something that humans face with the inevitability of climate change affecting future generations. In mapping the relationship between sustainability, fashion designer's design process, and the way curators communicate sustainable themes, an overall understanding of sustainable culture can be understood in the industry.

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  • 2020-05

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Creating to compete: juried exhibitions of Native American painting, 1946-1960

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In the middle of the 20th century, juried annuals of Native American painting in art museums were unique opportunities because of their select focus on two-dimensional art as opposed to

In the middle of the 20th century, juried annuals of Native American painting in art museums were unique opportunities because of their select focus on two-dimensional art as opposed to "craft" objects and their inclusion of artists from across the United States. Their first fifteen years were critical for patronage and widespread acceptance of modern easel painting. Held at the Philbrook Art Center in Tulsa (1946-1979), the Denver Art Museum (1951-1954), and the Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery in Santa Fe (1956-1965), they were significant not only for the accolades and prestige they garnered for award winners, but also for setting standards of quality and style at the time. During the early years of the annuals, the art was changing, some moving away from conventional forms derived from the early art training of the 1920s and 30s in the Southwest and Oklahoma, and incorporating modern themes and styles acquired through expanded opportunities for travel and education. The competitions reinforced and reflected a variety of attitudes about contemporary art which ranged from preserving the authenticity of the traditional style to encouraging experimentation. Ultimately becoming sites of conflict, the museums that hosted annuals contested the directions in which artists were working. Exhibition catalogs, archived documents, and newspaper and magazine articles about the annuals provide details on the exhibits and the changes that occurred over time. The museums' guidelines and motivations, and the statistics on the award winners reveal attitudes toward the art. The institutions' reactions in the face of controversy and their adjustments to the annuals' guidelines impart the compromises each made as they adapted to new trends that occurred in Native American painting over a fifteen year period. This thesis compares the approaches of three museums to their juried annuals and establishes the existence of a variety of attitudes on contemporary Native American painting from 1946-1960. Through this collection of institutional views, the competitions maintained a patronage base for traditional style painting while providing opportunities for experimentation, paving the way for the great variety and artistic progress of Native American painting today.

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  • 2012