Matching Items (49)

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Reading Difficulty Levels of Selected Articles in the Journal of Research in Music Education and Journal of Historical Research in Music Education

Description

Readability formulas are used widely in education, and increasingly in business and government. Over 30 years of research on more than 200 readability formulas has demonstrated moderate to strong predictive correlations with reading comprehension. In this study, five well-known readability

Readability formulas are used widely in education, and increasingly in business and government. Over 30 years of research on more than 200 readability formulas has demonstrated moderate to strong predictive correlations with reading comprehension. In this study, five well-known readability formulas correlated highly with each other when applied to selected recent historical articles (N = 22) from two music education research journals. The mean level of difficulty (readability) for all 22 articles was grade 14.04, near the beginning of the second year of college. Since research shows that most people read below their highest completed school grade and also prefer easier materials, this is probably an appropriate level of difficulty for the presumptive readers of these two journals (i.e., holders of undergraduate and graduate degrees). Professors, librarians, and others responsible for guiding students toward reading material at appropriate levels of readability could benefit from these results.

||中文摘要
《音樂教育研究期刊》與《音樂教育歷史研究期刊》中部分文章的閱讀難度水準
Alexandra H. Humphreys
Arizona State University—Phoenix, U.S.A.
Jere T. Humphreys
Arizona State University—Tempe, U.S.A.
可讀性估算公式被廣泛運用在教育領域,而且在商業和政府部門的使用頻率與日俱增。在過去的30 年裏,
研究人員共研發了200 多種可讀性估算公式,這些公式所估算的可讀性指標與實際閱讀理解程度具有中度
或很強的相關性。本文使用了五種著名的可讀性估算公式來評估最近發表的22 篇音樂教育史文章,發現這
五種公式的計算結果有很強的相關性。這22 篇文章的平均閱讀難度水準是14.04, 接近大學二年級初期的
閱讀水準。由於先前的研究结果显示大部分人喜歡閱讀難度水準低於本人學歷水準的文章以及比較容易理
解的文章,這兩種期刊中文章的閱讀難度水準非常適合預計的閱讀對象(有學士學位和研究生學位的人)。
本文研究結果可能會對那些大學教授,圖書館員和其他負責指導學生閱讀的人員有所幫助。

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2013

Seeds of Change

Description

The images capture the Seeds of Change exhibit, which was co-sponsored by the Native Seeds/SEARCH and exhibited in Noble Library from October 2012 to July 2013. The display featured information about local seed history, the current efforts to protect cro

The images capture the Seeds of Change exhibit, which was co-sponsored by the Native Seeds/SEARCH and exhibited in Noble Library from October 2012 to July 2013. The display featured information about local seed history, the current efforts to protect crop diversity, and rare botanical books about gardening and herbals from ASU's Patten Collection within ASU's Special Collection.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2012-10-30

Building a Foundation for Lifelong Research: Emphasizing Open Access and Open Educational Resources in Allied Health Higher Education

Description

Objectives: Highlight top open access and open educational resources in health sciences and provide examples of their use in supporting higher education curriculum needs to respond to online, distance, flipped classroom, and hybrid learning structures, and to ensure familiarity with

Objectives: Highlight top open access and open educational resources in health sciences and provide examples of their use in supporting higher education curriculum needs to respond to online, distance, flipped classroom, and hybrid learning structures, and to ensure familiarity with lifelong continuing education and research resources for evidence-based practice in allied health fields.

Methods: "a student's education is only as valuable as the information that a student has access to" Matt Cooper (president of the National Association of Graduate and Professional Students, 2012). Evidence-based practice is no longer a new concept in health professions or education, but its integration into allied health higher education curricula and its inclusion by health professionals in everyday, lifelong practice still presents challenges. One challenge is affordable access to research study findings and data, and to resources that index such information. A librarian from a public, research-1 university will draw from experiences and practices at her institution, and from a review of such at similar institutions. She will present methods to promote: use of open access and open educational resources, greater participation in these movements, and curriculum-related applications.

Results: This flipped presentation will include an overview of top overall and health sciences-related open access and open educational resources: how to find them and suggestions for evaluation criteria. It will also include options to promote and use Creative Commons search and licensing for discovering and sharing materials licensed for others to use, reuse, and adapt. Methods for promoting open access and open educational resources in higher educational and other settings will follow, with a final overview of newly expanding options for do-it-yourself and open science initiatives including opportunities for involvement in health research and innovation.

Conclusions: Join us, and bring your laptop, tablet, or mobile device! This presentation will be a "flipped presentation," with a brief (ten-to-fifteen minutes) voice-over PowerPoint presentation sent out ahead of time. The in-person session will offer a hands-on approach with opportunities to delve into using one or more major sources of open access or open educational resources to discover resources to recommend for supporting curricula, professional development, or training. You will also have a chance to collaborate with colleagues and explore ideas for promotional events and materials to build awareness of open access and open education initiatives. Leave with first-hand knowledge of new resources and an action plan for an event to promote these important initiatives within your community.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-03-15

Building a Framework Together: Embedded Understanding of Faculty Scholarly Publishing and Research Support Services

Description

Objectives: To develop an experiential understanding of what services and resources are most valuable to faculty throughout research and publishing processes. To use this understanding in combination with information in the literature to develop and provide services that anticipate researcher

Objectives: To develop an experiential understanding of what services and resources are most valuable to faculty throughout research and publishing processes. To use this understanding in combination with information in the literature to develop and provide services that anticipate researcher needs at each step of the process.

Methods: Facilitating open access publishing, best practices in literature reviews, scholarly research writing, clinical research data management, preservation, and accessibility: all of these are areas that librarians are working to support in many institutions. In this paper, two librarians from two research-1 universities provide a brief review of relevant literature. They follow with lessons learned and best practices identified during experiences as part of graduate student or faculty learning and working groups. These include: participation in a clinical research evaluation course; being a coauthor during writing, submitting, and revising of a scholarly peer-reviewed article, and negotiating copyright terms with an academic publisher; and participating in a faculty writing group for mutual motivation and constructive commentary on in-process writing projects.

Results: In this observational and participative study, the authors found that by taking advantage of opportunities to join groups in their research communities, they expanded their own skill sets while also expanding their contextual understanding of researcher support needs, including faculty, instructors, researchers, and graduate students. Through physical and online participation in learning, training, and working spaces along with their constituent communities, the authors built strong connections and mutual understanding. By being present (online or in-person) when questions occurred, they increased opportunities to provide in-context support for literature review searching techniques; citation management tools; copyright, journal selection, and publishing questions; and data management planning.

Conclusions: Each profession, discipline, and employment has its learning communities, informal or time-specific subgroups that come about as needed or for required trainings. Learning communities are where those in a given discipline or employment explore tasks in a collaborative setting and learn together, developing new skills and mastery through practice with peer and expert feedback. Such communities might take the form of a course on clinical research, an informal writing group, a seminar series, or even a cross-department event-planning group. By joining such groups, librarians can build on common experiences to form stronger relationships with their communities, gaining two critical benefits: (1) opportunities to provide research and information expertise in context and (2) greater recognition as part of the community and of what librarians do and their areas of expertise.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05-19

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Reading Difficulty Levels of Selected Articles in the Journal of Research in Music Education and Journal of Historical Research in Music Education

Description

Readability formulas are used widely in education, and increasingly in business and government. Over 30 years of research on more than 200 readability formulas has demonstrated moderate to strong predictive correlations with reading comprehension. In this study, five well-known readability

Readability formulas are used widely in education, and increasingly in business and government. Over 30 years of research on more than 200 readability formulas has demonstrated moderate to strong predictive correlations with reading comprehension. In this study, five well-known readability formulas correlated highly with each other when applied to selected recent historical articles (N = 22) from two music education research journals. The mean level of difficulty (readability) for all 22 articles was grade 14.04, near the beginning of the second year of college. Since research shows that most people read below their highest completed school grade and also prefer easier materials, this is probably an appropriate level of difficulty for the presumptive readers of these two journals (i.e., holders of undergraduate and graduate degrees). Professors, librarians, and others responsible for guiding students toward reading material at appropriate levels of readability could benefit from these results.

Contributors

Fad Diets and Evidence-Based Research: 3 Mini-Case Studies in Student-Driven How-To Research Sessions

Description

As a Health Sciences Librarian at a large public research university, requests for one off library sessions, or online how-to support, to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) research skills are common. Having mastered brief 'hands-on' activities to practice skills learned, I

As a Health Sciences Librarian at a large public research university, requests for one off library sessions, or online how-to support, to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) research skills are common. Having mastered brief 'hands-on' activities to practice skills learned, I was ready to branch out, and so were some faculty with whom I work, especially in the fields of Nutrition, Exercise, and Wellness. For Spring 2013 I worked with faculty to try pre-class time assignments followed by participatory, hands-on, student reporting (flipped) class sessions on:

1. Finding the source of research reported in health news articles.
2. Identifying high level EBP research studies on a nutrition topic.
3. Exploring career and research tools in Kinesiology.

This session will include a brief overview of each case study with discussion opportunities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05-13

How Do Google, Google Scholar, and Other Google Tools Help Health Professionals Navigate the Oceans of Information?

Description

As health information professionals we are familiar with specialized resources such as PubMed and CINAHL but less familiar with general freely available tools such as Google, Google Scholar, and other open Google tools. We wondered:

1. What Google tools are Health

As health information professionals we are familiar with specialized resources such as PubMed and CINAHL but less familiar with general freely available tools such as Google, Google Scholar, and other open Google tools. We wondered:

1. What Google tools are Health Sciences Researchers and Healthcare Professionals using, and how are they using them?
2. How effective are Google and/or Google Scholar for literature searching?
3. What other research is needed in this area?

Methods
We searched for: ‘Google’ across five health sciences and health sciences related databases (CINAHL, Cochrane, PsycInfo, PubMed, Web of Science) and in Google Scholar (*For Google Scholar we searched: health AND google). We reviewed the first 100 citations from each database and selected results that: 1) Mentioned use of a Google tool, or 2) Discussed the effectiveness of Google or Google Scholar in scholarly literature searching. Out of the second group, we selected and read the 10 most relevant articles discussing the effectiveness of Google and/or Google Scholar for literature searching. We tried out recommended best practices to search for topics we had previously searched only in subject specific databases.

Results
Health Sciences Researchers and Healthcare Professionals use many Google tools for a variety of purposes. Each tool was used in different ways by authors writing in the Health Sciences (see pie charts and examples in poster). Regarding literature searching the poster includes Google Scholar content sources, Top Search Strategies for Google Scholar, and Considerations for using Google Scholar for literature searching.

Conclusions
Health Science researchers use a variety of Google tools to gather and manipulate data, and to visualize and disseminate results. Health care professionals use Google tools to facilitate interventions and for interactive educational materials. For Literature searching our results encourage using Google Scholar to complement subject specific databases. Its unique content makes it a valuable resource for finding additional documents.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-07-26

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Open Access Bookmarks

Description

A poster presentation on resources and strategies from Arizona State University Libraries to encourage understanding of and participation in Open Access practices, including promotional materials (flyers, library guides, videos, and more) and persuasive talking points.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2013-04-10

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North, South, East and West: Best Practices in Information Literacy Services for International Students at Arizona Universities

Description

Poster about meeting the academic and cultural needs of international students at the Arizona State University Libraries and the University of Arizona Libraries. The poster presentation focuses on:

1. Strategies to promote information literacy skills of international students in the two

Poster about meeting the academic and cultural needs of international students at the Arizona State University Libraries and the University of Arizona Libraries. The poster presentation focuses on:

1. Strategies to promote information literacy skills of international students in the two university libraries.
2. What the libraries are doing to improve services to meet the needs and encourage library use among international students.
3. Partnerships that have been established with other academic departments or institutions.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2014-11-12

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Open Access Handout

Description

A poster presentation on resources and strategies from Arizona State University Libraries to encourage understanding of and participation in Open Access practices, including promotional materials (flyers, library guides, videos, and more) and persuasive talking points.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2013-04-10