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Phoebus 2: A Journal of Art History

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Phoebus 2: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” by Jack Breckenridge, p. 3.

“Contributors” p. 4-5.

“Table of Contents” p. 6-7.

“The Problem of Antisolimenismo in Neapolitan Baroque Painting” by Donald Rabiner, p. 8-16.

“Mid-Fourteenth Century Painting in Suchou: Some Lesser

Phoebus 2: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” by Jack Breckenridge, p. 3.

“Contributors” p. 4-5.

“Table of Contents” p. 6-7.

“The Problem of Antisolimenismo in Neapolitan Baroque Painting” by Donald Rabiner, p. 8-16.

“Mid-Fourteenth Century Painting in Suchou: Some Lesser Masters” by Claudia Brown, p. 17-30.

“A Re-Examination of the Cult of Demeter and the Meaning of the Eleusinian Mysteries” by Sherly Farness, p. 31-38. 

“Arizona Portfolio” p. 39-53. 

          “Wooden Cross” by Mildred Monteverde, p. 40-43.

          “Le Petit Tablier” by Rosalind Robinson, p. 44-47.

          “La Réunion des plus Célèbres Monuments Antiques de la France” by Vicki C. Wright, p.
          48-53. 

“An Unpublished Rowlandson Sketchbook” by Anthony Gully, p. 54-74.

“Are We Ready for Shih-T'ao?” by Ju-hsi Chou, p. 75-87. 

A Conversation Between Adolph Gottlieb and Jack Breckenridge” transcribed by Jack Breckenridge, p. 88-96. 

“Three Recent Art Reference Books” by Winberta Yao, p. 97-102

Contributors

Created

Date Created
1979

Phoebus 1: A Journal of Art History

Description

Phoebus 1: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents 

“Preface” by Ju-hsi Chou, p. 4-6. 

“Dedication” by Harry Wood, p. 7-8.

“Style and Symbolism in the Awatobi Kiva Mural Paintings” by Marvin Cohodas, p. 9-21.

“Mr. B and the Cherubim: A Critical

Phoebus 1: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents 

“Preface” by Ju-hsi Chou, p. 4-6. 

“Dedication” by Harry Wood, p. 7-8.

“Style and Symbolism in the Awatobi Kiva Mural Paintings” by Marvin Cohodas, p. 9-21.

“Mr. B and the Cherubim: A Critical Examination of William Blake's 'A Descriptive Catalogue' of 1809” by Anthony Gully, p. 23-46. 

“Arizona Portfolio” p. 47-64.

          “La Muse de Guillaume Apollinaire (The Muse of Guillaume Apollinaire)” by Anthony
          Gully, p. 48-51.

          “Wild Geese, Flowering Plants, and Tall Reeds” by Ju-hsi Chou, p. 52-55.

          “Ting” by Ju-hsi Chou, p. 56-59.

          “Homage to Watteau” by Robin Dowden, p. 60-64.

“A Note on a Letter from Roger Hilton to Terry Frost” by Jack Breckenridge, p. 65-74.

“Ming Idealism and Landscape Painting” by Ju-hsi Chou, p. 75-92.

“Classic Maya Elements in the Iconography of Rulership at El Tajin, Veracruz, Mexico” by Michael Kampen, p. 93-104. 

“Anne de Coursey Clapp, Wen Cheng-ming, ‘The Ming Artist and Antiquity’” by Anne de Coursey Clapp and Wen Cheng-ming, p. 105-108.

“‘7+5 Sculptors in the 1950s’: An Exhibition in the Phoenix Art Museum” 108-113.

“List of Contributors” by 114-116.

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
1978

Phoebus 3: A Journal of Art History

Description

Phoebus 3: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” by Jack Breckenridge, p. 5.

“A Possible Interpretation of the Bird-man Figure Found on Objects Associated with the Southern Cult of the Southeastern United States, A.D. 1200 to 1350” by

Phoebus 3: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” by Jack Breckenridge, p. 5.

“A Possible Interpretation of the Bird-man Figure Found on Objects Associated with the Southern Cult of the Southeastern United States, A.D. 1200 to 1350” by Lee Anne Wilson, p. 6-18.

“John Milton’s ‘Unholy Trinity’: (Satan, Sin, and Death)” by Anthony Gully, p. 19-36.

“Arizona Portfolio” p. 38-84.

          “Voyage of the Sesostris: Elihi Vedder in Egypt” by Hugh Broadley, p. 39-51.

          “Theodore Roszak’s ‘Emergence: Transition I’ at Arizona State University” by Joan
          Seeman Robinson, p. 52-53.

          “‘La peur donnant des ailes au courage by Jean Cocteau: a Drawing in the Phoenix Art
          Museum” by Anne Gully and Susan Benforado Gunther, p. 54-63.

          “John Mix Stanley, a ‘Hudson River’ Painter in Arizona” by James K. Ballinger, p. 64-72.

          “‘Corn Husking’ by Winslow Homer” by Gerald Eager, p. 73-79.

          “A Plate from the Meissen Swan Service in the Phoenix Art Museum” by Barbara
          Nachtigall, p. 80-84.

“Death in the Darkroom: Poisonings of Nineteenth Century Photographers” by Bill Jay, p. 85-98.

“Oral History in Art: A New Tool” by Winberta Yao, p. 99-108.

“A Note from a Reader” p. 109. 

“Contributors” p. 110-112

Contributors

Created

Date Created
1981

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Area‐Based Urban Renewal Approach for Smart Cities Development in India: Challenges of Inclusion and Sustainability

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Cities in the Global South face rapid urbanization challenges and often suffer an acute lack of infrastructure and governance capacities. Smart Cities Mission, in India, launched in 2015, aims to offer a novel approach for urban renewal of 100 cities

Cities in the Global South face rapid urbanization challenges and often suffer an acute lack of infrastructure and governance capacities. Smart Cities Mission, in India, launched in 2015, aims to offer a novel approach for urban renewal of 100 cities following an area‐based development approach, where the use of ICT and digital technologies is particularly emphasized. This article presents a critical review of the design and implementation framework of this new urban renewal program across selected case‐study cities. The article examines the claims of the so‐called “smart cities” against actual urban transformation on‐ground and evaluates how “inclusive” and “sustainable” these developments are. We quantify the scale and coverage of the smart city urban renewal projects in the cities to highlight who the program includes and excludes. The article also presents a statistical analysis of the sectoral focus and budgetary allocations of the projects under the Smart Cities Mission to find an inherent bias in these smart city initiatives in terms of which types of development they promote and the ones it ignores. The findings indicate that a predominant emphasis on digital urban renewal of selected precincts and enclaves, branded as “smart cities,” leads to deepening social polarization and gentrification. The article offers crucial urban planning lessons for designing ICT‐driven urban renewal projects, while addressing critical questions around inclusion and sustainability in smart city ventures.`

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Created

Date Created
2021-05-07

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How Will the COVID-19 Pandemic Affect the Future of Urban Life? : Early Evidence from Highly-Educated Respondents in the United States

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Attitudes and habits are extremely resistant to change, but a disruption of the magnitude of the COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to bring long-term, massive societal changes. During the pandemic, people are being compelled to experience new ways of interacting,

Attitudes and habits are extremely resistant to change, but a disruption of the magnitude of the COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to bring long-term, massive societal changes. During the pandemic, people are being compelled to experience new ways of interacting, working, learning, shopping, traveling, and eating meals. Going forward, a critical question is whether these experiences will result in changed behaviors and preferences in the long term. This paper presents initial findings on the likelihood of long-term changes in telework, daily travel, restaurant patronage, and air travel based on survey data collected from adults in the United States in Spring 2020. These data suggest that a sizable fraction of the increase in telework and decreases in both business air travel and restaurant patronage are likely here to stay. As for daily travel modes, public transit may not fully recover its pre-pandemic ridership levels, but many of our respondents are planning to bike and walk more than they used to. These data reflect the responses of a sample that is higher income and more highly educated than the US population. The response of these particular groups to the COVID-19 pandemic is perhaps especially important to understand, however, because their consumption patterns give them a large influence on many sectors of the economy.

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Created

Date Created
2020-09-03