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Feature Extraction on Sentiment Attitude Values to Better Predict the Stock Market Using Twitter Sentiment

Description

Behavioral economics suggests that emotions can affect an individual’s decision making. Recent research on this idea’s application on large societies hints that there may exist some correlation or maybe even some causation relationship between public sentiment—at least what can be

Behavioral economics suggests that emotions can affect an individual’s decision making. Recent research on this idea’s application on large societies hints that there may exist some correlation or maybe even some causation relationship between public sentiment—at least what can be pulled from Twitter—and the movement of the stock market. One major result of consistent research on whether or not public sentiment can predict the movement of the stock market is that public sentiment, as a feature, is becoming more and more valid as a variable for stock-market-based machine learning models. While raw values typically serve as invaluable points of data, when training a model, many choose to “engineer” new features for their models—deriving rates of change or range values to improve model accuracy.
Since it doesn’t hurt to attempt to utilize feature extracted values to improve a model (if things don’t work out, one can always use their original features), the question may arise: how could the results of feature extraction on values such as sentiment affect a model’s ability to predict the movement of the stock market? This paper attempts to shine some light on to what the answer could be by deriving TextBlob sentiment values from Twitter data, and using Granger Causality Tests and logistic and linear regression to test if there exist a correlation or causation between the stock market and features extracted from public sentiment.

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2020-05

Reclamation: A movement-based exploration of the individual and collective narrative of apology in women

Description

Personal experiences with body image dysmorphia and an eating disorder necessitated that I do a thorough investigation into why they happened and why I felt this way about my body. For this project, not only was I motivated by my

Personal experiences with body image dysmorphia and an eating disorder necessitated that I do a thorough investigation into why they happened and why I felt this way about my body. For this project, not only was I motivated by my own struggles, but I noticed that these experiences were shared among my family, my friends, and my fellow peers in the dance community. We had been struggling since childhood. I began to realize that these behaviors and thought patterns were manifestations of apology, an apology that women have been learning, living, and spreading since our beginnings. Why do women apologize? How does this apology affect how we view, treat, and navigate our bodies in space? In what ways can dance be the mechanism by which we remove apology and individually and collectively find joy, freedom, and liberation? Not only was I interested in understanding the ‘why’, but I was deeply interested in finding a solution. Research for this thesis came from written materials, stories that the dancers and I shared, and choreographic research in the body. The final goal was to create a community-based performance of dance, spoken word, and storytelling that demonstrated the findings from each of those questions and catalyzed a conversation about how we can liberate ourselves. We used rehearsals to explore our own experiences within apology and shame, while also exploring how the ways in which we practice being unapologetic in the dance space can translate to how we move through the world on a daily basis.

Through a deep analysis and application of Sonya Renee Taylor’s book The Body Is Not An Apology, I discovered that apology is learned. We learn how to apologize through body shame, the media, family/generational trauma, and government/law/policy. This apology is embodied through gestures, movement patterns, and postures, such as bowing the head, hunching the shoulders, and walking around others. Apology causes us to view our bodies as things to be manipulated, discarded, and embarrassed by. After recognizing why we apologize and how it affects our bodies, we can then begin to think of how to remove it. Because the body the site of the problem, it is also the site of the solution. Dance gives us an opportunity to deeply learn our bodies, to cultivate their power, and to heal from their traumas. By being together in community as women, we are able to feel seen and supported as we work through uncharted territory of being free from apology in these bodies. By dancing in ways that allow us to take up space, to be free, to be unapologetic, we use dance as a practice for life. Through transforming ourselves, we begin to transform the world and rewrite the narrative of how we exist in and move through our bodies as women.

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2020-05

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Role of Metabolism in Antibiotic Resistance

Description

Each year, more and more multi-drug resistant bacterial strains emerge, thus complicating treatment and increasing the average stay in the intensive care unit. As antibiotics are being rendered inefficient, there is a need to look into ways of weakening the

Each year, more and more multi-drug resistant bacterial strains emerge, thus complicating treatment and increasing the average stay in the intensive care unit. As antibiotics are being rendered inefficient, there is a need to look into ways of weakening the internal state of bacterial cells to make them more susceptible to antibiotics. For this, we first need to understand what methods bacteria employ to fight against antibiotics. In this work, we have reviewed how bacteria respond to antibiotics. There is a similarity in response to antibiotic exposure and starvation (stringent stress) which changes the metabolic state. We have delineated what metabolism changes take place and how they are associated with oxidative stress. For example, there is a common change in NADH concentration that is tied to both metabolism and oxidative stress. Finally, we have compared the findings in literature with our research on an antibiotic-resistant RNA polymerase mutant that alters the gene expression profile in the general areas of metabolism and oxidative stress. Based on this thesis, we have suggested a couple of strategies to make antibiotics more efficient; however, as antibiotic-mediated killing is very complex, researchers need to delve deeper to understand and manipulate the full cellular response.

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Date Created
2020-05

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Input-Elicitation Methods for Crowdsourced Human Computation

Description

Collecting accurate collective decisions via crowdsourcing
is challenging due to cognitive biases, varying
worker expertise, and varying subjective scales. This
work investigates new ways to determine collective decisions
by prompting users to provide input in multiple
formats. A crowdsourced task

Collecting accurate collective decisions via crowdsourcing
is challenging due to cognitive biases, varying
worker expertise, and varying subjective scales. This
work investigates new ways to determine collective decisions
by prompting users to provide input in multiple
formats. A crowdsourced task is created that aims
to determine ground-truth by collecting information in
two different ways: rankings and numerical estimates.
Results indicate that accurate collective decisions can
be achieved with less people when ordinal and cardinal
information is collected and aggregated together
using consensus-based, multimodal models. We also
show that presenting users with larger problems produces
more valuable ordinal information, and is a more
efficient way to collect an aggregate ranking. As a result,
we suggest input-elicitation to be more widely considered
for future work in crowdsourcing and incorporated
into future platforms to improve accuracy and efficiency.

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2020-05

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Automatic Water Shutoff Web Server Infrastructure and Smart Home Integration

Description

This thesis covers the continued development of an automatic water shutoff product developed as a capstone project by students in the college of engineering. The continued development covers the process of setting up a publicly accessible web server along

This thesis covers the continued development of an automatic water shutoff product developed as a capstone project by students in the college of engineering. The continued development covers the process of setting up a publicly accessible web server along with required server components and creating an Alexa skill for smart home integration.

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Date Created
2020-12

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Hana: An Open-Domain Chatbot Application for Language Learning

Description

Learning a new language can be very challenging. One significant aspect of learning a language is learning how to have fluent verbal and written conversations with other people in that language. However, it can be difficult to find other people

Learning a new language can be very challenging. One significant aspect of learning a language is learning how to have fluent verbal and written conversations with other people in that language. However, it can be difficult to find other people available with whom to practice conversations. Additionally, total beginners may feel uncomfortable and self-conscious when speaking the language with others. In this paper, I present Hana, a chatbot application powered by deep learning for practicing open-domain verbal and written conversations in a variety of different languages. Hana uses a pre-trained medium-sized instance of Microsoft's DialoGPT in order to generate English responses to user input translated into English. Google Cloud Platform's Translation API is used to handle translation to and from the language selected by the user. The chatbot is presented in the form of a browser-based web application, allowing users to interact with the chatbot in both a verbal or text-based manner. Overall, the chatbot is capable of having interesting open-domain conversations with the user in languages supported by the Google Cloud Translation API, but response generation can be delayed by several seconds, and the conversations and their translations do not necessarily take into account linguistic and cultural nuances associated with a given language.

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Date Created
2020-12

PRISMS contemporary music festival day 2

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Date Created
2018-10-28

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The Impact of Time Constraints on HackerRank Assessments

Description

Technical interviews have become the standard for assessing candidates for software development roles. The purpose of this study is to determine whether time constraints impact the performance of individuals on HackerRank coding assessments. During the surveys and HackerRank assessment, subjects

Technical interviews have become the standard for assessing candidates for software development roles. The purpose of this study is to determine whether time constraints impact the performance of individuals on HackerRank coding assessments. During the surveys and HackerRank assessment, subjects wore two physiological sensors: a galvanic skin response bracelet, Shimmer3+GSR that measures emotional intensity and an EEG headset, B-Alert X24 that measures cognitive workload, engagement, and distraction. Subjects were also monitored by external sensors, such as an eye tracker to measure visual attention and by a facial-based emotion recognition system through a webcam to measure their visual attention and emotions. Through these metrics, as well as a Big Five personality demographic survey and mental demand survey, the study examines the difference in performance between strictly timed assessments and timed assessments with time to revise.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Developing Inventory Control and Build Management Software for Spacecraft Engineering

Description

Engineering an object means engineering the process that creates the object. Today, software can make the task of tracking these processes robust and straightforward. When engineering requirements are strict and strenuous, software custom-built for such processes can prove essential. The

Engineering an object means engineering the process that creates the object. Today, software can make the task of tracking these processes robust and straightforward. When engineering requirements are strict and strenuous, software custom-built for such processes can prove essential. The work for this project was developing ICDB, an inventory control and build management system created for spacecraft engineers at ASU to record each step of their engineering processes. In-house development means ICDB is more precisely designed around its users' functionality and cost requirements than most off-the-shelf commercial offerings. By placing a complex relational database behind an intuitive web application, ICDB enables organizations and their users to create and store parts libraries, assembly designs, purchasing and location records for inventory items, and more.

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Date Created
2018-05