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Dynamics of Ferrofluidic Flow in the Taylor-Couette System With a Small Aspect Ratio

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We investigate fundamental nonlinear dynamics of ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette flow - flow confined be-tween two concentric independently rotating cylinders - consider small aspect ratio by solving the ferro-hydrodynamical equations, carrying out systematic bifurcation analysis. Without magnetic field, we find steady flow

We investigate fundamental nonlinear dynamics of ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette flow - flow confined be-tween two concentric independently rotating cylinders - consider small aspect ratio by solving the ferro-hydrodynamical equations, carrying out systematic bifurcation analysis. Without magnetic field, we find steady flow patterns, previously observed with a simple fluid, such as those containing normal one- or two vortex cells, as well as anomalous one-cell and twin-cell flow states. However, when a symmetry-breaking transverse magnetic field is present, all flow states exhibit stimulated, finite two-fold mode. Various bifurcations between steady and unsteady states can occur, corresponding to the transitions between the two-cell and one-cell states. While unsteady, axially oscillating flow states can arise, we also detect the emergence of new unsteady flow states. In particular, we uncover two new states: one contains only the azimuthally oscillating solution in the configuration of the twin-cell flow state, and an-other a rotating flow state. Topologically, these flow states are a limit cycle and a quasiperiodic solution on a two-torus, respectively. Emergence of new flow states in addition to observed ones with classical fluid, indicates that richer but potentially more controllable dynamics in ferrofluidic flows, as such flow states depend on the external magnetic field.

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2017-01-06

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The Effects of Instruction on Self-Assessed Research Knowledge, Ability, and Interest Among Greek Music Educators

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This study investigated the effects of a training seminar and selected background variables on Greek music teachers’ attitudes and self-evaluation regarding research. Public school, university, and conservatory teachers (n=41) participated in 16 hours of seminar instruction over a two-week period at

This study investigated the effects of a training seminar and selected background variables on Greek music teachers’ attitudes and self-evaluation regarding research. Public school, university, and conservatory teachers (n=41) participated in 16 hours of seminar instruction over a two-week period at a Greek university. The seminar provided an introduction to empirical research methods, testing, and basic statistical concepts and, procedures and an overview of music aptitude testing and the administration of selected tests. There was no significant pre-seminar difference in self-assessed interest and ability in research between participants who had and had not taken a prior research course. However, participants with prior training scored significantly higher on self-assessed knowledge of selected research concepts. A mixed-model analysis of variance indicated that the seminar instruction was effective in improving self-assessed research knowledge and interest, and that those with previous research training improved more than those without such training.

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2007

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Relationships Between School Music Ensemble Participation and Academic Achievement in the USA

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The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between school music participation and a composite measure of academic achievement in American schools. The authors examined the first (baseline) year of a longitudinal study commissioned by the National Center for

The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between school music participation and a composite measure of academic achievement in American schools. The authors examined the first (baseline) year of a longitudinal study commissioned by the National Center for Education Statistics, conducted in 1988 (NELS:88/94 Data Analysis system, with Additional Systems for High School and Beyond and the National Longitudinal Study of 1972, NCES, 1996). The data set contains information on more than 23,000 American middle school students, and is thought to be representative of the national as a whole.

Several previous researchers employing causal modeling techniques have found relationships between extracurricular activities and education attainment as measured by standardized academic achievement tests. In music, students with school band and orchestra experience make significantly higher grades in high school mathematics, English, and social science than do non-performing students, and instrumental music instruction seems to improve scores on tests of spatial-temporal ability, which is thought to correlate with ability in mathematics.

The present study confirmed previous findings on relationships among music participation and academic achievement. Significantly more students in school music choral or instrumental groups ranked above the 50th percentile in academic grades than did other students (p < .05). For instrumental students, these results held true for all four socioeconomic quartiles, for both boys and girls, and for all races/ethnicities. For choral students, only students in the third and fourth quartiles and Caucasian students ranked significantly higher than other students.

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2000

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Music Education Research in the U.S.A.: An Overview [Greek]

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An overview of music education research in the United States, divided into historical, philosophical, and empirical research modes and topics. Included are discussions of the major topic areas investigated, publication venues, and the relative size of each enterprise. Research efforts

An overview of music education research in the United States, divided into historical, philosophical, and empirical research modes and topics. Included are discussions of the major topic areas investigated, publication venues, and the relative size of each enterprise. Research efforts are limited to some extent by lack of agreed-upon goals for music education, and there has been relatively few attempts to develop sociological research in music education. Also needed are more cross-cultural, international efforts in music education, starting with sharing results.

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1998

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Plato's Views on Three Modes of Music Education Praxis: Composing, Performing, and Listening

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Some ancient Greek perspectives on three praxial musical activities: composing, performing, and listening. Early founders of modern Western thought created boundaries and hierarchies among these three activities, in addition to the scientific study of music. Under the dualistic conception of

Some ancient Greek perspectives on three praxial musical activities: composing, performing, and listening. Early founders of modern Western thought created boundaries and hierarchies among these three activities, in addition to the scientific study of music. Under the dualistic conception of reality, or "truth," original musical works became objects. Plato stipulated the use of "good" songs, reserved composition for a select few, and believed that "goodness" in music could be determined objectively by society's leaders, a form of universal "truth" represented in artistic products. The praxis of music performing, regarded as a "practiced habit" and given lower status than composing, was deemed an appropriate leisure-time activity for gentlemen. Virtuoso music performance was to be left to non-citizens, leaving citizens free for more intellectual pursuits. . . . [I]t is no surprising that subsequent educators taught music primarily through theoretical means. . . .

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2007

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Music Teacher Education in Turkey and in the USA: Musical Aptitude and Attitude toward Teaching [Turkish Abstract]

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An investigation of musical aptitude and attitudes toward teaching among pre-service music teachers in Turkey (n = 42) and the United States (n = 35). Multivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences by nationality in favor of the Turkish subjects on

An investigation of musical aptitude and attitudes toward teaching among pre-service music teachers in Turkey (n = 42) and the United States (n = 35). Multivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences by nationality in favor of the Turkish subjects on the tonal, rhythm, and total tests on the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation (AMMA) by Edwin Gordon. There were no significant differences by sex or for the interaction of nationality and sex. There were negative correlations between AMMA scores and scores on the Minnesota Teacher Attitude Inventory, which means that subjects with high music aptitude scores tended to hold attitudes that do not predict effective teaching behaviors. There were also significant differences by nationality on a questionnaire about attitudes toward various music instructional activities in schools.

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2007

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Connections Between Theory and Praxis in Music Education: Some Historical, Philosophical, and Practical Perspectives

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The first part of this paper provides an overview of some important historic theories of education and their influences on music education. The second part deals with two specific theories related to music education, both from the late twentieth century.

The first part of this paper provides an overview of some important historic theories of education and their influences on music education. The second part deals with two specific theories related to music education, both from the late twentieth century. The paper presents some insights into the effects of these theories on the practice of music education (praxis). The important historic theories of education with implications for education and music education discussed in this paper are:

1. Charles Darwin's theory of evolution, published in 1759.
2. Jean Jacques Rousseau's concepts of childhood, published in 1762.
3. Henrich Pestalozzi's theory on the sequencing of instruction, published (variously) in 1810.  
4. G. Stanley Hall's theories of child development stages, especially his construct of adolescence (1880s). 
5. Education theories of John Dewey and other leaders of the progressive education movement.
6. Jean Piaget's theories of childhood development stages.

The influences of these theories on music education praxis are discussed largely as a group. The two theories of music education discussed in this paper are:

1. Edwin Gordon's Music Learning Theory.
2. Albert LeBlanc's theory of music preference.

Both these theories are illustrated and their influences on music education praxis are discussed separately.

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2002

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Music Education in the U.S.A.: An Overview [Greek Version]

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This is the published Greek language translation of the original English language speech as it was presented at the first conference of the Greek Society for Music Education, held in Thessaloniki, Greece on June 26-28, 1998. It was one of

This is the published Greek language translation of the original English language speech as it was presented at the first conference of the Greek Society for Music Education, held in Thessaloniki, Greece on June 26-28, 1998. It was one of a pair of papers presented as the Honor Guest Lecturer Addresses (the other being "Music Education Research in the U.S.A.: An Overview").

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1998-06-26

Music Education Research in the U.S.A.: An Overview

Description

Text of paper presented at the first conference of the Greek Society for Music Education, held in Thessaloniki, Greece on June 26-28, 1998. It was one of a pair of papers presented as the Honor Guest Lecturer Addresses (the other being

Text of paper presented at the first conference of the Greek Society for Music Education, held in Thessaloniki, Greece on June 26-28, 1998. It was one of a pair of papers presented as the Honor Guest Lecturer Addresses (the other being "Music Education in the U.S.A.: An Overview"). This item includes the English and Greek translations of the work. 

 

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1998

Music Education in the U.S.A.: An Overview

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This paper describes the evolution of music in American public schools and universities. Included are some statistics on the number of elementary, middle, and high schools that offer each type of music instruction, including band, choir, orchestra, and music for

This paper describes the evolution of music in American public schools and universities. Included are some statistics on the number of elementary, middle, and high schools that offer each type of music instruction, including band, choir, orchestra, and music for general students. Also included are some discussions on the evolution of university music programs. The paper concludes with a description of the new national voluntary standards for music education, and some assessments of the strengths and weaknesses of American music education programs. 

This was part of a pair of papers presented as the Honor Guest Lecturer Addresses (the other being "Music Education Research in the U.S.A.: An Overview"). This item includes the English and Greek translations of the work. 

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1998-06-26