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Visual analytics for spatiotemporal cluster analysis

Description

Traditionally, visualization is one of the most important and commonly used methods of generating insight into large scale data. Particularly for spatiotemporal data, the translation of such data into a visual form allows users to quickly see patterns, explore summaries

Traditionally, visualization is one of the most important and commonly used methods of generating insight into large scale data. Particularly for spatiotemporal data, the translation of such data into a visual form allows users to quickly see patterns, explore summaries and relate domain knowledge about underlying geographical phenomena that would not be apparent in tabular form. However, several critical challenges arise when visualizing and exploring these large spatiotemporal datasets. While, the underlying geographical component of the data lends itself well to univariate visualization in the form of traditional cartographic representations (e.g., choropleth, isopleth, dasymetric maps), as the data becomes multivariate, cartographic representations become more complex. To simplify the visual representations, analytical methods such as clustering and feature extraction are often applied as part of the classification phase. The automatic classification can then be rendered onto a map; however, one common issue in data classification is that items near a classification boundary are often mislabeled.

This thesis explores methods to augment the automated spatial classification by utilizing interactive machine learning as part of the cluster creation step. First, this thesis explores the design space for spatiotemporal analysis through the development of a comprehensive data wrangling and exploratory data analysis platform. Second, this system is augmented with a novel method for evaluating the visual impact of edge cases for multivariate geographic projections. Finally, system features and functionality are demonstrated through a series of case studies, with key features including similarity analysis, multivariate clustering, and novel visual support for cluster comparison.

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Agent

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Date Created
2016

Designing a Digital Humanities Project Presentation

Description

Elizabeth Grumbach, the project manager of the Institute for Humanities Research's Digital Humanities Initiative, shares methodologies and best practices for designing a digital humanities project. The workshop will offer participants an introduction to digital humanities fundamentals, specifically tools and methodologies.

Elizabeth Grumbach, the project manager of the Institute for Humanities Research's Digital Humanities Initiative, shares methodologies and best practices for designing a digital humanities project. The workshop will offer participants an introduction to digital humanities fundamentals, specifically tools and methodologies. Participants explore technologies and platforms that allow scholars of all skills levels to engage with digital humanities methods. Participants will be introduced to a variety of tools (including mapping, visualization, data analytics, and multimedia digital publication platforms), and how and why to choose specific applications, platforms, and tools based on project needs.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-09-26

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Controversy analysis: clustering and ranking polarized networks with visualizations

Description

US Senate is the venue of political debates where the federal bills are formed and voted. Senators show their support/opposition along the bills with their votes. This information makes it possible to extract the polarity of the senators. Similarly, blogosphere

US Senate is the venue of political debates where the federal bills are formed and voted. Senators show their support/opposition along the bills with their votes. This information makes it possible to extract the polarity of the senators. Similarly, blogosphere plays an increasingly important role as a forum for public debate. Authors display sentiment toward issues, organizations or people using a natural language.

In this research, given a mixed set of senators/blogs debating on a set of political issues from opposing camps, I use signed bipartite graphs for modeling debates, and I propose an algorithm for partitioning both the opinion holders (senators or blogs) and the issues (bills or topics) comprising the debate into binary opposing camps. Simultaneously, my algorithm scales the entities on a univariate scale. Using this scale, a researcher can identify moderate and extreme senators/blogs within each camp, and polarizing versus unifying issues. Through performance evaluations I show that my proposed algorithm provides an effective solution to the problem, and performs much better than existing baseline algorithms adapted to solve this new problem. In my experiments, I used both real data from political blogosphere and US Congress records, as well as synthetic data which were obtained by varying polarization and degree distribution of the vertices of the graph to show the robustness of my algorithm.

I also applied my algorithm on all the terms of the US Senate to the date for longitudinal analysis and developed a web based interactive user interface www.PartisanScale.com to visualize the analysis.

US politics is most often polarized with respect to the left/right alignment of the entities. However, certain issues do not reflect the polarization due to political parties, but observe a split correlating to the demographics of the senators, or simply receive consensus. I propose a hierarchical clustering algorithm that identifies groups of bills that share the same polarization characteristics. I developed a web based interactive user interface www.ControversyAnalysis.com to visualize the clusters while providing a synopsis through distribution charts, word clouds, and heat maps.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2015

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Methodologies in Predictive Visual Analytics

Description

Predictive analytics embraces an extensive area of techniques from statistical modeling to machine learning to data mining and is applied in business intelligence, public health, disaster management and response, and many other fields. To date, visualization has been broadly used

Predictive analytics embraces an extensive area of techniques from statistical modeling to machine learning to data mining and is applied in business intelligence, public health, disaster management and response, and many other fields. To date, visualization has been broadly used to support tasks in the predictive analytics pipeline under the underlying assumption that a human-in-the-loop can aid the analysis by integrating domain knowledge that might not be broadly captured by the system. Primary uses of visualization in the predictive analytics pipeline have focused on data cleaning, exploratory analysis, and diagnostics. More recently, numerous visual analytics systems for feature selection, incremental learning, and various prediction tasks have been proposed to support the growing use of complex models, agent-specific optimization, and comprehensive model comparison and result exploration. Such work is being driven by advances in interactive machine learning and the desire of end-users to understand and engage with the modeling process. However, despite the numerous and promising applications of visual analytics to predictive analytics tasks, work to assess the effectiveness of predictive visual analytics is lacking.

This thesis studies the current methodologies in predictive visual analytics. It first defines the scope of predictive analytics and presents a predictive visual analytics (PVA) pipeline. Following the proposed pipeline, a predictive visual analytics framework is developed to be used to explore under what circumstances a human-in-the-loop prediction process is most effective. This framework combines sentiment analysis, feature selection mechanisms, similarity comparisons and model cross-validation through a variety of interactive visualizations to support analysts in model building and prediction. To test the proposed framework, an instantiation for movie box-office prediction is developed and evaluated. Results from small-scale user studies are presented and discussed, and a generalized user study is carried out to assess the role of predictive visual analytics under a movie box-office prediction scenario.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017