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Building a Framework Together: Embedded Understanding of Faculty Scholarly Publishing and Research Support Services

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Objectives: To develop an experiential understanding of what services and resources are most valuable to faculty throughout research and publishing processes. To use this understanding in combination with information in the literature to develop and provide services that anticipate researcher

Objectives: To develop an experiential understanding of what services and resources are most valuable to faculty throughout research and publishing processes. To use this understanding in combination with information in the literature to develop and provide services that anticipate researcher needs at each step of the process.

Methods: Facilitating open access publishing, best practices in literature reviews, scholarly research writing, clinical research data management, preservation, and accessibility: all of these are areas that librarians are working to support in many institutions. In this paper, two librarians from two research-1 universities provide a brief review of relevant literature. They follow with lessons learned and best practices identified during experiences as part of graduate student or faculty learning and working groups. These include: participation in a clinical research evaluation course; being a coauthor during writing, submitting, and revising of a scholarly peer-reviewed article, and negotiating copyright terms with an academic publisher; and participating in a faculty writing group for mutual motivation and constructive commentary on in-process writing projects.

Results: In this observational and participative study, the authors found that by taking advantage of opportunities to join groups in their research communities, they expanded their own skill sets while also expanding their contextual understanding of researcher support needs, including faculty, instructors, researchers, and graduate students. Through physical and online participation in learning, training, and working spaces along with their constituent communities, the authors built strong connections and mutual understanding. By being present (online or in-person) when questions occurred, they increased opportunities to provide in-context support for literature review searching techniques; citation management tools; copyright, journal selection, and publishing questions; and data management planning.

Conclusions: Each profession, discipline, and employment has its learning communities, informal or time-specific subgroups that come about as needed or for required trainings. Learning communities are where those in a given discipline or employment explore tasks in a collaborative setting and learn together, developing new skills and mastery through practice with peer and expert feedback. Such communities might take the form of a course on clinical research, an informal writing group, a seminar series, or even a cross-department event-planning group. By joining such groups, librarians can build on common experiences to form stronger relationships with their communities, gaining two critical benefits: (1) opportunities to provide research and information expertise in context and (2) greater recognition as part of the community and of what librarians do and their areas of expertise.

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Date Created
2014-05-19

Open Your Minds to Open Access!

Description

A poster presentation on resources and strategies from Arizona State University Libraries to encourage understanding of and participation in Open Access practices, including promotional materials (flyers, library guides, videos, and more) and persuasive talking points.

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Date Created
2013-04-10

Let's Go! An Open Access Travel Guide

Description

Take a journey to discover how you can provide quality information to your patrons for free! Explore the world of Open Access Resources! Open Access refers to scholarly information that is free, online, and free of most copyright and licensing

Take a journey to discover how you can provide quality information to your patrons for free! Explore the world of Open Access Resources! Open Access refers to scholarly information that is free, online, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. This makes it easier for people to find and use reliable information on a myriad of subjects, such as health information, educational materials, or business resources. Knowledge of Open Access is important for all librarians to help us best serve our communities and stretch our dwindling budgets. Your tour guides will give an overview of Open Access, discuss legislative issues, demonstrate how to find open access resources, and explain how librarians can get involved.

Presented at the SDLA/NDLA/MPLA Tri-conference 2013

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Date Created
2013-09-26

Opening Minds to Open Access: Best Practices at Arizona State University

Description

Increasingly, information seekers can utilize “open access” (OA) resources, primarily scholarly research journals, at no cost to themselves. However, many who could benefit from free access to research do not know about it. This presentation will present resources and outreach activities

Increasingly, information seekers can utilize “open access” (OA) resources, primarily scholarly research journals, at no cost to themselves. However, many who could benefit from free access to research do not know about it. This presentation will present resources and outreach activities related to Open Access from the Arizona State University library system. The purpose is to encourage greater understanding of and participation in OA practices. Examples include:

1. Library guides on scholarly communication and open access resources.
2. Resources for Open Access Week, Open Education Week, and other events.
3. Participation in open access through outreach to our user communities.
4. Institutional memberships in OA organizations and other efforts such as ASU’s digital repository and a resolution passed by the librarians’ governance committee.

This presentation will benefit librarians who seek ideas and tools to engage colleagues and promote Open Access to their user communities.

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Created

Date Created
2013-04-10