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Reading Difficulty Levels of Selected Articles in the Journal of Research in Music Education and Journal of Historical Research in Music Education

Description

Readability formulas are used widely in education, and increasingly in business and government. Over 30 years of research on more than 200 readability formulas has demonstrated moderate to strong predictive correlations with reading comprehension. In this study, five well-known readability

Readability formulas are used widely in education, and increasingly in business and government. Over 30 years of research on more than 200 readability formulas has demonstrated moderate to strong predictive correlations with reading comprehension. In this study, five well-known readability formulas correlated highly with each other when applied to selected recent historical articles (N = 22) from two music education research journals. The mean level of difficulty (readability) for all 22 articles was grade 14.04, near the beginning of the second year of college. Since research shows that most people read below their highest completed school grade and also prefer easier materials, this is probably an appropriate level of difficulty for the presumptive readers of these two journals (i.e., holders of undergraduate and graduate degrees). Professors, librarians, and others responsible for guiding students toward reading material at appropriate levels of readability could benefit from these results.

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Open Your Minds to Open Access!

Description

A poster presentation on resources and strategies from Arizona State University Libraries to encourage understanding of and participation in Open Access practices, including promotional materials (flyers, library guides, videos, and more) and persuasive talking points.

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Created

Date Created
2013-04-10

Let's Go! An Open Access Travel Guide

Description

Take a journey to discover how you can provide quality information to your patrons for free! Explore the world of Open Access Resources! Open Access refers to scholarly information that is free, online, and free of most copyright and licensing

Take a journey to discover how you can provide quality information to your patrons for free! Explore the world of Open Access Resources! Open Access refers to scholarly information that is free, online, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. This makes it easier for people to find and use reliable information on a myriad of subjects, such as health information, educational materials, or business resources. Knowledge of Open Access is important for all librarians to help us best serve our communities and stretch our dwindling budgets. Your tour guides will give an overview of Open Access, discuss legislative issues, demonstrate how to find open access resources, and explain how librarians can get involved.

Presented at the SDLA/NDLA/MPLA Tri-conference 2013

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Created

Date Created
2013-09-26

Opening Minds to Open Access: Best Practices at Arizona State University

Description

Increasingly, information seekers can utilize “open access” (OA) resources, primarily scholarly research journals, at no cost to themselves. However, many who could benefit from free access to research do not know about it. This presentation will present resources and outreach activities

Increasingly, information seekers can utilize “open access” (OA) resources, primarily scholarly research journals, at no cost to themselves. However, many who could benefit from free access to research do not know about it. This presentation will present resources and outreach activities related to Open Access from the Arizona State University library system. The purpose is to encourage greater understanding of and participation in OA practices. Examples include:

1. Library guides on scholarly communication and open access resources.
2. Resources for Open Access Week, Open Education Week, and other events.
3. Participation in open access through outreach to our user communities.
4. Institutional memberships in OA organizations and other efforts such as ASU’s digital repository and a resolution passed by the librarians’ governance committee.

This presentation will benefit librarians who seek ideas and tools to engage colleagues and promote Open Access to their user communities.

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Created

Date Created
2013-04-10