Matching Items (7)

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The Impact of Collaborative Learning on the Academic English Proficiency of International College Students

Description

English proficiency is one of the major factors affecting international students’ academic adjustment to American universities. Many international college students select to improve their academic English proficiency through an English

English proficiency is one of the major factors affecting international students’ academic adjustment to American universities. Many international college students select to improve their academic English proficiency through an English intensive program. Collaborative learning is an educational approach to teaching and learning that allows students and teachers to engage in a common task and work together to search for knowledge and skills. This thesis study aims to develop, design, and iteratively refine strategies to help English intensive program teachers build collaborative learning and promote international students’ effective collaboration, so as to improve students' academic English proficiency. In this study, two different collaborative learning strategies were designed, implemented and iterated. Data was collected using qualitative methods and follow the principle of design-based research (DBR; Barab, 2014) The results of this study suggest that successful instructional strategies for collaborative learning should be designed in the following ways. First, gathering participants’ opinions and feedback at all phases of design and iteration; Second, linking the new strategies or activity to students’ grade should be the center of the design. Third, in DBR,researchers need to be patient to build good relationships with practitioners, which can provide a basis for continuing research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Increasing Student Engagement and Student Voice Through Collaborative Reflection

Description

In this study, the current literature regarding student engagement and student voice were reviewed to explore the connection between these two classroom elements. Currently, frequently incorporating student voice in

In this study, the current literature regarding student engagement and student voice were reviewed to explore the connection between these two classroom elements. Currently, frequently incorporating student voice in order to increase student engagement most commonly takes place at the high school and university levels. Thus, utilizing Finn’s (1989) participation-identification theory, this study set out to implement a practical design intervention in an elementary classroom to increase student engagement through the incorporation of student voice. Using Design-Based Research, I implemented a collaborative reflection process which allowed students, teacher/researcher, and co-educators to provide feedback on classroom task and participant structures. The feedback was then considered for further iterations of the task and participant structures. This was a pilot study of the collaborative reflection process and was implemented in a fourth-grade math classroom with 26 participants. Along with participating in the collaborative reflection process, the student participants also took a 26 question Learner Empowerment Measure to survey their feelings of identity with the classroom before and after the design intervention. After analyzing audio data gathered during the classroom tasks, as well as student feedback, it was found that student participation did increase due to the design intervention. However, there was no measurable difference in students’ feelings of identity with the classroom due to the collaborative reflection process. Future studies should consider implementing the collaborative reflection process in multiple classrooms across diverse activities during the school year.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Investigating the Role of Student Ownership in the Design of Student-facing Learning Analytics Dashboards (SFLADs) in Relation to Student Perceptions of SFLADs

Description

Learning analytics application is evolving into a student-facing solution. Student-facing learning analytics dashboards (SFLADs), as one popular application, occupies a pivotal position in online learning. However, the application of SFLADs

Learning analytics application is evolving into a student-facing solution. Student-facing learning analytics dashboards (SFLADs), as one popular application, occupies a pivotal position in online learning. However, the application of SFLADs faces challenges due to teacher-centered and researcher-centered approaches. The majority of SFLADs report student learning data to teachers, administrators, and researchers without direct student involvement in the design of SFLADs. The primary design criteria of SFLADs is developing interactive and user-friendly interfaces or sophisticated algorithms that analyze the collected data about students’ learning activities in various online environments. However, if students are not using these tools, then analytics about students are not useful. In response to this challenge, this study focuses on investigating student perceptions regarding the design of SFLADs aimed at providing ownership over learning. The study adopts an approach to design-based research (DBR; Barab, 2014) called the Integrative Learning Design Framework (ILDF; Bannan-Ritland, 2003). The theoretical conjectures and the definition of student ownership are both framed by Self-determination theory (SDT), including four concepts of academic motivation. There are two parts of the design in this study, including prototypes design and intervention design. They are guided by a general theory-based inference which is student ownership will improve student perceptions of learning in an autonomy-supportive SFLAD context. A semi-structured interview is used to gather student perceptions regarding the design of SFLADs aimed at providing ownership over learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Accountability groups to enhance language learning in a university intensive English program

Description

This mixed methods classroom research examined if accountability groups in the lower proficiency levels of a university intensive English program would improve students’ language acquisition. Students were assigned partners for

This mixed methods classroom research examined if accountability groups in the lower proficiency levels of a university intensive English program would improve students’ language acquisition. Students were assigned partners for the study period with whom they completed assignments inside and outside of class, as well as set goals for use of language in their own context. Based in the ecological perspective and socio- cultural theory, activities reinforced social bonds, scaffolded the learning objectives in a communicative way, modeled the transfer of knowledge to the world outside the classroom, and allowed students to create new affordances in which to practice and use the language. Analysis of qualitative data from interviews, text messages, exit slips, and field notes, as well as quantitative data from student academic records, pre and post tests of curricular objectives, and pre and post attitudinal surveys, showed that students were developing a stronger sense of autonomy in their language learning. They viewed their peers and themselves as knowledgeable others, helping one another to learn vocabulary and structures in each student’s zone of proximal development. Learner engagement in the treatment groups, as measured by classroom attendance, increased over a control group, as did overall grade averages in all courses. Students with no previous time in the program showed more improvement than those who had been in the program for at least one session prior. Students also showed increased fluency, as measured by the word count on a constructive task in the pre- and post-test of curricular objectives.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Producing positive perceptions: effects of video production in instructor introduction videos on student perceptions

Description

This mixed methods study examined instructor introduction videos for use in online learning. This study intended to identify the influence of video production value on student perceptions of student-instructor intent,

This mixed methods study examined instructor introduction videos for use in online learning. This study intended to identify the influence of video production value on student perceptions of student-instructor intent, specifically in the areas of perceived student-instructor communication and student-instructor connection. This study also examined which production style most accurately aligns student perceptions with instructor intent as well as which video production style is preferred by students.

Using a set of production guidelines, an instructor produced two introduction videos; one of low production value, one of high production value. Student participants were surveyed on their perceptions of the instructor as featured in both videos. The instructor was interviewed using similar questions in order to identify instructor intent and compare instructor intent to student perceptions.

Analysis of data showed that there was no statistical difference between video production value in students’ perceived student-instructor connection or student-instructor communication when compared to the instructor’s intent in the same areas. Data analysis also showed that a high production value was more accurate in portraying instructor intent, however a low production value was preferred by students and portrayed the instructor more positively.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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The Effects of Cognitive Engagement while Learning about Misinformation on Social Media

Description

Social media platforms have emerged as leading communication channels for social interaction and information sharing in the early part of the 21st century. In an ideal world, social media users

Social media platforms have emerged as leading communication channels for social interaction and information sharing in the early part of the 21st century. In an ideal world, social media users should feel that they can interpret the social interactions they witness and the information that is shared on social media platforms as inherently honest and truthful; however, reality is very different. Social media platforms have become vehicles capable of spreading misinformation quickly and broadly. Information literacy offers a pathway for mitigating the negative consequences of misinformation found within various forms of content provided that instruction is contextually defined and applicable to the current information environment. A cognitive framework was used to help facilitate greater efficiency of learning information literacy practices.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between cognitive engagement and learning performance on an instructional module about misinformation on social media. A total of 133 undergraduate students participated in the study. They were surveyed for demographic characteristics, social media activity, and self-efficacy before being randomly assigned to one of four instructional conditions (passive, active, constructive, control). Additional measures included a pre-test, post-test and an instrument measuring users’ satisfaction with their instructional experience.

The study produced several statistically significant differences: (a) in the ability of demographic factors encompassing age, gender and years in college to predict the prior knowledge of misinformation on social media; (b) between the means of the three treatment and one control groups and their scores on the post-test assessment controlling for prior knowledge; and (c) between the means of the three treatment and one control groups and time necessary to complete instruction. Using a regression analysis, no significant differences were found with respect to information-focused self-efficacy factors being able to predict prior knowledge of misinformation on social media. The findings from this study can contribute to the basis of support for the use of the Interactive, Constructive, Active, Passive (ICAP) framework in assessing the use of cognitive engagement in designing instruction.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Summer of tinkering: sociocultural views of children's learning while tinkering in social and material worlds

Description

As interest in making and STEM learning through making and tinkering continue to rise, understanding the nature, process, and benefits of learning STEM through making have become important topics for

As interest in making and STEM learning through making and tinkering continue to rise, understanding the nature, process, and benefits of learning STEM through making have become important topics for research. In addition to understanding the basics of learning through making and tinkering, we need to understand these activities, examine their potential benefits, and find out ways to facilitate such learning experiences for all learners with resources that are readily available. This dissertation is a study of children’s learning while tinkering inspired by the Educational Maker Movement. It is motivated by the projects that children playfully create with broken toys, art and craft resources, and other found objects, and the connections of such activities to learning. Adopting a sociocultural lens this dissertation examines eight to twelve-year-olds’ learning while tinkering in collaboration with friends and family, as well as on their own.

Using a case study methodology and studying interactions and transactions between children, materials, tools, and designs this study involves children learning while tinkering over a week-long workshop as well as over the summer in the Southwest. The three hallmarks of this study are, first, an emphasis on sociocultural nature of the development of tinkering projects; second, an emphasis on meaning making while tinkering with materials, tools, and design, and problem-solving; and third, an examination of the continuation of tinkering using newly acquired tools and skills beyond the duration of the workshop. In doing so, this dissertation contributes to the ongoing discussion of children’s playful tinkering, how and why it counts as learning, and STEM learning associated with tinkering. Implications for future learning and the ways in which tinkering connects to children’s everyday fabric of activities are considered.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018