Matching Items (10)

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Design & Community Development: The Built Environment's Role in the Health of Native American Communities

Description

The institutionalized environments of government aid, void of architectural creativity, are regular sights in Native American communities. Meanwhile, the community falls victim to obesity, diabetes, addiction, and many other maladies.

The institutionalized environments of government aid, void of architectural creativity, are regular sights in Native American communities. Meanwhile, the community falls victim to obesity, diabetes, addiction, and many other maladies. I believe that the design of a community's buildings can greatly affect the health of the community. This thesis focuses on the social aspects of design. How might we enhance the social capital of Native communities through the built environment?

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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The Effect of Retail Design on Consumer Purchasing Behavior

Description

This project researches the potential effects of retail design and layout and how it affects consumer-purchasing behavior. The research can be broken down into three large segments as well as

This project researches the potential effects of retail design and layout and how it affects consumer-purchasing behavior. The research can be broken down into three large segments as well as a case study. The first focuses on the consumers and the target market. The second examines store layout in terms of walkways, wall placements, and major pathways throughout the space. Third, the overall aesthetics and design are studied, focusing on color, texture, shapes, and lighting. Lastly, a case study on a popular women's retail store, Antrhoplogie, is examined based on the above research. This project gives interesting insight into the minds of the consumer in retail environments as well as the effect of design and overall experience the consumers have in many types of retail stores.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Lighthouse: Improving Pediatric Palliative and Hospice Care

Description

5 With over 55,000 pediatric deaths per year in the United States, there is a tremendous need for pediatric palliative and hospice care facilities. While this programmatic typology exists in

5 With over 55,000 pediatric deaths per year in the United States, there is a tremendous need for pediatric palliative and hospice care facilities. While this programmatic typology exists in several countries around the world - including over 45 centers in the United Kingdom alone - only two pediatric palliative and hospice facilities are operational in the United States. Offering a spectrum of care that extends from respite to end-of-life, these facilities would benefit over 8,600 children daily in the U.S. In addition to compiling research in order to build a case for the express need for such a facility, I propose that this typology requires a unique organizational scheme that diverges from the traditional program of home or hospital. Rather than adhering to the hierarchies found in a singlefamily residence, upon which the current model is organized, this new type of design revolves around the Nurses' Station as the nucleus of the facility. Additionally, the design relies heavily upon biophilic stratagem and play therapy, which further influence the program and form of the building. These tactics are used to enhance the psychological state of the patient, family, and medical staff and to mitigate the impact of a life-threatening or life-limiting illness.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Redefining the Learning Experience: A New Curriculum and Academic Environment for Children Ages 11-13

Description

This project has the intent of redefining the learning experience of children ages 11-13 through student-centered design that of provides a beneficial environment for emotional, social, and physical health in

This project has the intent of redefining the learning experience of children ages 11-13 through student-centered design that of provides a beneficial environment for emotional, social, and physical health in which students can become more independent in both accountability of actions and in their thinking to see the larger picture and real-world application of each topic they learn and to foster thinking at a global scale. This is to be completed through the focus on the cognitive development and physical needs of the children at this age, a combination of the pedagogical models of inquiry-based, project-based, and community-based learning, connection to resources, implementation of design completed with understanding and testing of learning and working collaborative spaces, emphasizing the biophilic experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

Click-and-Mortar: The Role of In-Store Experience and Branding as Touchpoints in the Consumer Journey

Description

With brick-and-mortar retail actively under threat from a growing e-commerce market, companies are being challenged to re-evaluate the way they engage with their customers in the physical realm. Companies are

With brick-and-mortar retail actively under threat from a growing e-commerce market, companies are being challenged to re-evaluate the way they engage with their customers in the physical realm. Companies are under pressure to give consumers a reason to make a trip to their stores over succumbing to the convenience of sitting at home in their pajamas and shopping online. Because of the rapid development of e-commerce, there is a growing necessity for retailers to prove their worth by means of marketing the in-store experience as superior to that of what online could offer. Brands are navigating the grey area between the digital and physical realms in order to successfully fulfill the needs of the modern consumer through viewing these different entities as touchpoints in the overall consumer experience.

This study explores the connection between the interior design of retail spaces and consumer behavior in the direct-to-consumer environment. The research explores the relationships between consumer behavior, intangible brand identity, and the physical (brick-and-mortar) retail environment and explores interior design’s role in the development of a new form of retail found in brands whose presence began online and later entered the physical realm. Through analyzing store aesthetics, consumer preferences, and purchasing behavior, this research provides insight into what matters to consumers in a direct-to-consumer retail environment and how designers at the forefront of this movement are adapting, and ultimately draws conclusions about how companies can utilize interior design and store aesthetics as part of the consumer journey to maximize the impact of their brand experiences.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

Experience: Where Interiority and Technology Coexist

Description

Our world is ever-changing, and thus, design changes with it. Technology reigns supreme in our society, and as both evolve, our world is transforming to become temporary, especially in terms

Our world is ever-changing, and thus, design changes with it. Technology reigns supreme in our society, and as both evolve, our world is transforming to become temporary, especially in terms of the built environment. The coalescing of built space and technology are spilling over into various cultural outlets to create interactive environments in places such as museums, festivals, events, and even retail shopping. As technology continues to evolve, its influence on interior design continues to grow and morph from place to experience. More specifically, creating experience through non-permanent built spaces is especially interesting because it shows the power of design through the impression it leaves; spaces are able to affect viewers in mere seconds. This study will explore the development of experience through the intersection of technology, temporary installations, and interiority.
Through the research of the temporary built environment, technology and experience, in addition to the relationship between the three, a better understanding of how the interior design can shift to accommodate our changing society and desire for ephemeral experiences were developed. Pop up installations and events were studied to understand not only how they are designed and built within existing environments, but also to learn about the impressions they leave on viewers. Furthermore, social media trends in relation to the temporary environments have been observed to understand their influence on design. This means of communication has added a layer of complexity to these experiences and how they are now inherently connected to cater to the desires of Millenials and Centennials. Technology-based research will be necessary to then explore in a creative project how both interiority and technology relate to create experiences.

Ultimately, two creative projects were developed, which demonstrate the relationship of technology and interiority in the creation of experiential environments, by constructing two interactive design-build pieces. This was done through the combination of theory and creative project, or praxis, which highlighted existing research and explored new applications for use in the world of interior design.

The research in this thesis has two main components: the study of interior environments, especially those created as pop-ups, and also the study of technology along with its relationship to the built environment and human interaction. For the technology component, different interactive technologies have been explored by learning how to write code in order to use an Arduino system and python language to manipulate light, sound, and projection. As a result, two interactive light pieces were created which harnessed the power of technology to transform the built environment into a memorable experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Architectural Natural Measures: Reducing Opportunity for a School Shooting

Description

Through the study of Biophilic Design, Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design, and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, this thesis investigates how physical characteristics of a space influence human behavior and proposes

Through the study of Biophilic Design, Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design, and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, this thesis investigates how physical characteristics of a space influence human behavior and proposes Architectural Natural Measures to reduce opportunity for a school shooting. These measures are intended to be a cost effective and holistic alternative to conventional, highly visible security measures that often have an adverse effect on student perception of school safety.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Designing Fire Wise Communities: Fire Resistive Architectural Methods and Materials

Description

Abstract

Wildfires are rapidly becoming one of the biggest issues that California has to face. Every year, fire season gets longer as lack of rain, high winds and faulty power lines

Abstract

Wildfires are rapidly becoming one of the biggest issues that California has to face. Every year, fire season gets longer as lack of rain, high winds and faulty power lines combine in a recipe for disaster. Nearly the entire state, north to south, has been affected by at least one major firestorm since the fall of 2017. They have become the new normal, razing towns in hours and leaving nothing but wreckage in their wake. Because of this growing problem, solutions for fire-proofing existing towns and strategies for rebuilding those affected are more important than ever. Using design as a lens with which to address this problem, this thesis explores materials that have been tested and proven to be more fire-resistant, as well as outlines through case studies how communities and designers can implement these strategies to create safer communities in wildfire-prone areas. The case studies paint a variety of pictures of what fire-resistant architecture and design can be, offering a comprehensive set of guidelines for both community members and designers to move forward with building or rebuilding structures in a wildland urban interface zone. Researching homes built in both California and Australia widens the perspective of how large the problem of wildfire truly is in terms of building destruction. Solutions such as prefab modular home construction are also becoming a popular option as they are fast and inherently more fire-resistant than traditionally rebuilt homes. At the urban and regional level, research has revealed the importance of planning homes and communities in a way which integrates with the natural topography of the site and minimizes surrounding fuel loads. In addition, building materials such as concrete, straw bale and heavy timber are the most fire-resistant, especially when clad with an outer layer of tile, brick or other noncombustible material and with protected vent openings. Interior materials should minimize the usage of wood detailing, unless using certain products that have the appearance of wood but are actually created by non-combustible materials. Homes should have more compartmentalization to slow down a fire from spreading should one occur in the structure. Fire detection/suppression systems should be up to date and using the latest technology.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Students’ Experiences of Studio-based Learning in Undergraduate Interior Design Education at Nankai University in China and Arizona State University in the United States

Description

Students’ learning experience in studio are an essential part in studio-based learning mode and design education. Studio-based learning is defined as an active pedagogy in which the student learns multimodal

Students’ learning experience in studio are an essential part in studio-based learning mode and design education. Studio-based learning is defined as an active pedagogy in which the student learns multimodal by solving cases or problems. Students work with personal assignments or group assignments that are critiqued on the basis of formal and informal presentations. Studio-based Learning (SBL) is unlike other learning modes, not only because the pedagogy is different but also because of its distinctive learning spaces. SBL is carried out in the studio, a type of classroom within the university that supports this pedagogy. The studio is more like a combination of classroom and study room, students take courses in studio and are encouraged to finish their design project in the studio during their off-school hours.

Nowadays, the development of undergraduate design education and practice varies significantly among countries as a result of the varying curriculum and pedagogical evolution. For instance, Chinese education in interior design has only thirty years of development while the United States has over one hundred years of experience in the field. Even though both educational goals expect students to be able to manage developing design concepts and design projects, the differences between the two are numerous. This thesis studies a comparative analysis between the two systems and aims to identify students’ real needs and their perception of studio-based learning at Nankai University in China and Arizona State University in the United States as a means to recognize possibilities to improve students’ learning experience. The study includes students, their studio spaces, and their interior design undergraduate programs in both universities. The study utilizes qualitative methods including questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, and observations. The study also includes an analysis of both undergraduate interior design programs in these two universities as case studies. The findings are analyzed and translated into physical and pedagogical recommendations. The findings should be of value for students and faculty in interior design programs in both countries.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Architecture and Its Impact on Autism Spectrum Disorder

Description

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that impacts one’s social interaction, communication skills (both verbal and non-verbal), and cognitive function. Autism affects 1 in 60 children. Individuals with

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that impacts one’s social interaction, communication skills (both verbal and non-verbal), and cognitive function. Autism affects 1 in 60 children. Individuals with autism have trouble understanding facial expressions or social cues, and often see the world around them differently than a neurotypical individual (mainly increased sensitivity to sounds, motion, or lighting). As the name implies, autism is a spectrum, and no two individuals are alike. As the saying goes, “When you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism.” Movies such as Rain Man (1988) or The Accountant (2016) showcase autistic individuals who are higher-functioning; they are able to verbally communicate and live somewhat independently. Other autistic individuals, such as my brother, Tyler, are lower-functioning. Tyler is non-verbal and unable to be independent, and our day-to-day life is greatly shaped by this.<br/><br/>One thought that haunts the parents of autistic individuals is, “What happens when they’re older?” Even more scary is the question “What will happen when I’m gone?” My brother is on the autism spectrum, and my mother describes these thoughts as ones that “keep [her] up at night.” She explains, “I think it’s important for him to be completely engaged and productive, and we have that right now because we’re in our little safety bubble...that’s going to end...and it’s kind of scary.” Around 50,000 children with autism turn 18 every year in the United States, and nearly 90% of autistic individuals lose access to the services they have relied on throughout their entire lives. My hope is that architecture can help to answer this question by providing a place for adults on the autism spectrum to learn how to eventually live and work independently in the future. By implementing certain design features and design criteria to minimize the sensory overload issues commonly experienced by individuals with autism, we can create a safe space for learning for young adults on the autism spectrum.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05