Matching Items (5)

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Nanoscale Interphase Characterization of Agglomerated MWCNT in Composites Connected to Mode I Fracture

Description

Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) are a promising engineering material because of their multifunctionality and desirable mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. The mechanical and fracture properties of CFRPs rely on

Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) are a promising engineering material because of their multifunctionality and desirable mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. The mechanical and fracture properties of CFRPs rely on effective stress transfer from the bulk matrix to individual carbon fibers. Pristine carbon fibers (CF) are chemically unreactive and smooth, which inhibits stress transfer mechanisms and makes CF susceptible to matrix debonding. Current composite research aims to improve the synergy between the CF and surrounding matrix by engineering the interphase. The composite interphase is characterized by mechanical properties deviating from the fiber and matrix properties. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene nanoplatelets, and other carbon nanofillers have been studied extensively for their interphase-enhancing capabilities.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Effectiveness of Flipped Classroom for Mechanics of Materials

Description

The flipped classroom is a teaching method that flips the activities done in and out of class, i.e., concepts are learned out of class and problems are worked in class

The flipped classroom is a teaching method that flips the activities done in and out of class, i.e., concepts are learned out of class and problems are worked in class under the supervision of the instructor. Studies have indicated several benefits of the FC, including improved performance and engagement. In the past years, further studies have investigated the benefits of FC in statics, dynamics, and mechanics of materials courses and indicate similar performance benefits. However, these studies address a need for additional studies to validate their results due to the short length of their research or small classroom size. In addition, many of these studies do not measure student attitudes, such as self-efficacy, or the difference in time spent out of class on coursework. The objective of this research is to determine the effectiveness of the flipped classroom system (FC) in comparison to the traditional classroom system (TC) in a large mechanics of materials course. Specifically, it aims to measure student performance, student self-efficacy, student attitudes on lecture quality, motivation, attendance, hours spent out of class, practice, and support, and difference in impact between high, middle, and low achieving students. In order to accomplish this, three undergraduate mechanics of materials courses were analyzed during the spring 2015 semester. One FC section served as the experimental group (92 students), while the two TC sections served as the control group (125 students). To analyze student self-efficacy and attitudes, a survey instrument was designed to measure 18 variables and was administered at the end of the semester. Standardized core outcomes were compared between groups to analyze performance. This paper presents the specific course framework used in this FC, detailed results of the quantitative and qualitative analysis, and discussion of strengths and weaknesses. Overall, an overwhelming majority of students were satisfied with FC and would like more of their classes taught using FC. Strengths of this teaching method include greater confidence, better focus, higher satisfaction with practice in class and assistance received from instructors and peers, more freedom to express ideas and questions in class, and less time required outside of class for coursework. Results also suggest that this method has a greater positive impact on high and low achieving students and leads to higher performance. The criticisms made by students focused on lecture videos to have more worked examples. Overall, results suggest that FC is more effective than TC in a large mechanics of materials course.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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ROV Thruster Waterproofing through Magnetic Coupling

Description

The purpose of this project is to design a waterproof magnetic coupling that will allow the actuators on remotely operated vehicles (ROV) to remain water tight in extreme underwater conditions

The purpose of this project is to design a waterproof magnetic coupling that will allow the actuators on remotely operated vehicles (ROV) to remain water tight in extreme underwater conditions for longs periods of time. ROVs are tethered mobile robots controlled and powered by an operator from some distance away at the surface of the water. These vehicles all require some method for transmitting power to the surrounding water to interact with their environment, such as in thrusters for propulsion or a claw for manipulation. Many commercially available thrusters, for example, use shaft seals to transfer power through a waterproof housing to the adjacent water. Even though this works excellently for many of them, I propose that having a static seal and transmitting the power from the motor to the shaft through magnetic coupling will allow a much greater depth at which they are waterproof to be achieved. In addition, it will not require the chronic maintenance that dynamic shaft seals entail, making long scientific endeavors possible.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Design of a RF Transmitting Belt as Part of a Wireless SCS System

Description

The belt component of a unique and novel wireless spinal cord stimulator (SCS) system was conceived, designed, made, and verified. This thesis details and documents all work from inception through

The belt component of a unique and novel wireless spinal cord stimulator (SCS) system was conceived, designed, made, and verified. This thesis details and documents all work from inception through preliminary verification and includes recommendations for future work. The purpose, scope, and objectives of the design and the thesis are introduced. Background literature is presented to provide context for the wireless SCS system as well as the belt component of the system. The product development process used to design the product is outlined. Requirements and constraints are determined from customer needs. Design options are considered and the best concept is selected. The design is made, optimized, and verified to meet the requirements. Future work for this design, outside the scope of this thesis, is discussed. Recommendations and conclusions following completion of the design are included as well.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Theory vs Practice: An In-Depth Analysis Of Engineering Education and the Careers That Follow

Description

In a society that is becoming more technologically driven, it is important to have people to design, test, and build new things in order for society to progress. This is

In a society that is becoming more technologically driven, it is important to have people to design, test, and build new things in order for society to progress. This is oftentimes the role of an engineer. However, engineering school is not easy, and engineering students don’t always make it all the way through school to get an engineering job. This thesis is an in-depth analysis of an engineering student’s path - from choosing engineering as a major to ultimately transitioning into a full-time engineering job. It will do this by covering (1) what engineering is and what career opportunities exist within the discipline, (2) common pitfalls that students may encounter while going through engineering school, (3) how to get an engineering job in industry, and (4) how to appropriately transition into an industry job using the skills from engineering school. While talking about what engineering is and what career opportunities exist, this thesis will discuss engineering as a profession, the ABET accreditation board, and careers in industry vs academia. As part of common pitfalls that engineering students face, this thesis will discuss tenure track, theory vs reality, cooperative learning, and misconceptions about engineering. In order to talk about how to get an industry job, this thesis will discuss the impact of grades, relevant experience, communication, personal branding, and industry options. Finally, while talking about effectively transitioning into industry, this thesis will discuss understanding the skills gained from engineering school, the different roles in industry, and how to appropriately apply those skills. Ultimately this thesis aims to be a resource for students interested in engineering so that they can understand how to successfully make it through school and move into the work force effectively.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05