Matching Items (3)

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DNA Origami as Novel Immune Adjuvants

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Cytokines induced by inflammasome has been used for blood cancer treatments, yet these treatments have been less successful in the solid tumor microenvironment. Here precise-morphology DNA origami structures were implemented to accurately test the effect and mechanism of activation in

Cytokines induced by inflammasome has been used for blood cancer treatments, yet these treatments have been less successful in the solid tumor microenvironment. Here precise-morphology DNA origami structures were implemented to accurately test the effect and mechanism of activation in the NLRP3 inflammasome. THP1 WT cells, a macrophage cell line, were treated with eleven different DNA origami structures. The inflammasome activation of two cytokines, Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and Interferon beta (IFN-β), was measured using HEK Blue IL-1β cells, HEK Blue IFN-β cells, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Differences in activation signaling have the potential to provide the characterization required to address the intrinsic complexity of modulating an immune response. It is hoped that DNA origami will help induce more inflammation for solid tumors. The DNA origami was tested in three different volumes: 1 μL, 5 μL, and 10 μL. Overall, the origami that showed promising results were Mg Square. Tetrahedral and P53 block also showed potential but not as well as Mg square. Further testing of more DNA origami structures and testing them in mice are key to the success of targeted cancer immunotherapies in the neoadjuvant setting.

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Date Created
2019-05

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Lattice-Free Prediction of Three-Dimensional Structure of Programmed DNA Assemblies

Description

DNA can be programmed to self-assemble into high molecular weight 3D assemblies with precise nanometer-scale structural features. Although numerous sequence design strategies exist to realize these assemblies in solution, there is currently no computational framework to predict their 3D structures

DNA can be programmed to self-assemble into high molecular weight 3D assemblies with precise nanometer-scale structural features. Although numerous sequence design strategies exist to realize these assemblies in solution, there is currently no computational framework to predict their 3D structures on the basis of programmed underlying multi-way junction topologies constrained by DNA duplexes. Here, we introduce such an approach and apply it to assemblies designed using the canonical immobile four-way junction. The procedure is used to predict the 3D structure of high molecular weight planar and spherical ring-like origami objects, a tile-based sheet-like ribbon, and a 3D crystalline tensegrity motif, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our framework provides a new approach to predict programmed nucleic acid 3D structure on the basis of prescribed secondary structure motifs, with possible application to the design of such assemblies for use in biomolecular and materials science.

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Date Created
2014-12-01

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Self-assembly of complex DNA nanostructures and reconfigurable DNA devices

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Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as an excellent molecular building block for nanoconstruction in addition to its biological role of preserving genetic information. Its unique features such as predictable conformation and programmable intra- and inter-molecular Watson-Crick base pairing interactions make

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as an excellent molecular building block for nanoconstruction in addition to its biological role of preserving genetic information. Its unique features such as predictable conformation and programmable intra- and inter-molecular Watson-Crick base pairing interactions make it a remarkable engineering material. A variety of convenient design rules and reliable assembly methods have been developed to engineer DNA nanostructures. The ability to create designer DNA architectures with accurate spatial control has allowed researchers to explore novel applications in directed material assembly, structural biology, biocatalysis, DNA

computing, nano-robotics, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery.

This dissertation focuses on developing the structural design rules for "static" DNA nano-architectures with increasing complexity. By using a modular self-assembly method, Archimedean tilings were achieved by association of different DNA motifs with designed arm lengths and inter-tile sticky end interactions. By employing DNA origami method, a new set of design rules was created to allow the scaffolds to travel in arbitrary directions in a designed geometry without local symmetry restrictions. Sophisticated wireframe structures of higher-order complexity were designed and constructed successfully. This dissertation also presents the use of "dynamic" DNA nanotechnology to construct DNA origami nanostructures with programmed reconfigurations.

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Date Created
2015